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-age British & World English

Forming nouns:

age British & World English

The length of time that a person has lived or a thing has existed

age English Thesaurus

he retired at the age of 36

age gap British & World English

A difference in age between people, especially as a potential source of misunderstanding

age-old British & World English

Having existed for a very long time

ice age British & World English

A glacial episode during a past geological period

New Age British & World English

A broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture, with an interest in spirituality, mysticism, holism, and environmentalism

old age British & World English

The later part of normal life

ice age New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

cold period; the Ice Age series of glacial episodes during the Pleistocene period

New Age New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(capitals, no hyphen even when attributive)

age group British & World English

A number of people or things classed together as being of similar age

age-long British & World English

Having existed for a very long time

age-mate British & World English

A person or animal that is the same age as another

age range British & World English

A range of ages

full age British & World English

Adult status (especially with reference to legal rights and duties)

Iron Age British & World English

A prehistoric period that followed the Bronze Age, when weapons and tools came to be made of iron

Jazz Age British & World English

The 1920s in the US characterized as a period of carefree hedonism, wealth, freedom, and youthful exuberance, reflected in the novels of writers such as F. Scott Fitzgerald

legal age British & World English

The age at which a person takes on the rights and responsibilities of an adult

space age British & World English

The era starting when the exploration of space became possible

steam age British & World English

The time when trains were drawn by steam locomotives

Stone Age British & World English

A prehistoric period when weapons and tools were made of stone or of organic materials such as bone, wood, or horn

third age British & World English

The period in life of active retirement, following middle age

of an age British & World English

Old enough to be able or expected to do something

bottle age British & World English

Time spent by a wine maturing in its bottle

Bronze Age British & World English

A prehistoric period that followed the Stone Age and preceded the Iron Age, when weapons and tools were made of bronze rather than stone

Copper Age British & World English

The Chalcolithic period, especially in SE Europe

golden age British & World English

An idyllic, often imaginary past time of peace, prosperity, and happiness

heroic age British & World English

The period in Greek history and legend before the Trojan War and its aftermath, in which the legends of the heroes were set

mental age British & World English

A person’s mental ability expressed as the age at which an average person reaches the same ability

middle age British & World English

The period after early adulthood and before old age, about 45 to 65

nuclear age British & World English

The period in history usually considered to have begun with the first use of the atomic bomb (1945). It is characterized by nuclear energy as a military, industrial, and sociopolitical factor

reading age British & World English

A child’s reading ability expressed with reference to an average age at which a comparable ability is found

school age British & World English

The age range of children normally attending school

silver age British & World English

A period regarded as notable but inferior to a golden age, such as that of so-called silver Latin literature

golden age New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

lower case in phrases such as the golden age of rail travel

school age New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(two words, hyphen when attributive)

age hardening British & World English

Spontaneous hardening of a metal which occurs if it is quenched and then stored at ambient temperature or treated with mild heat


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