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Alexander1 British & World English

(356–323 bc), king of Macedon 336–323, son of Philip II; known as Alexander the Great. He conquered Persia, Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia, Bactria, and the Punjab; in Egypt he founded the city of Alexandria

Alexander2 British & World English

The name of three kings of Scotland:

Alexander3 British & World English

The name of three tsars of Russia:

Alexander New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(356–323 bc), king of Macedon 336–323; known as Alexander the Great

Alexander, Grover Cleveland British & World English

(1887–1950), US baseball player; known as Pete. A pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies 1911–17, the Chicago Cubs 1917–26, and the St. Louis Cardinals 1926–30, he retired with 373 career wins and 90 shutouts. Baseball Hall of Fame (1938)

Alexander, Harold British & World English

1st Earl Alexander of Tunis (1891–1969), British Field Marshal and Conservative statesman, holding commands during the Second World War; full name Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander

Pope, Alexander British & World English

(1688–1744), English poet. A major figure of the Augustan age, he is famous for his caustic wit and metrical skill, in particular his use of the heroic couplet. Notable works: The Rape of the Lock (1712; enlarged 1714); An Essay on Man (1733-4)

Alexander in Alexander technique British & World English

A system designed to promote well-being by retraining one’s awareness and habits of posture to ensure minimum effort and strain

Alexander in alexandrite British & World English

A gem variety of chrysoberyl which appears green in daylight and red in artificial light

Alexander in smart alec British & World English

A person who is irritating because they behave as if they know everything

Alekhine, Alexander British & World English

(1892–1946), Russian-born French chess player, world champion 1927–35 and from 1937 until his death

Alexander Nevsky British & World English

(Circa 1220–63), prince of Novgorod 1236–63; canonized as St Alexander Nevsky. He defeated the Swedes on the banks of the River Neva in 1240. Feast day, 30 August or 23 November

brandy Alexander British & World English

A cocktail made with brandy, chocolate liqueur, and cream

Buchan, Alexander British & World English

(1829–1907), Scottish meteorologist. He wrote a textbook on meteorology and produced maps and tables of atmospheric circulation, and of ocean currents and temperatures, based largely on information gathered on the voyage of HMS Challenger in 1872-6

Calder, Alexander British & World English

(1898–1976), American sculptor and painter. He was one of the first artists to introduce movement into sculpture, making mobiles incorporating abstract forms. His static sculptures are known by contrast as ‘stabiles’

Dubček, Alexander British & World English

(1921–92), Czechoslovak statesman, First Secretary of the Czechoslovak Communist Party 1968-9. Dubček was the driving force behind the political reforms of 1968, which prompted the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 and his removal from office. After the collapse of communism in 1989 he was elected speaker of the Federal Assembly in the new Czechoslovak parliament

Hamilton, Alexander British & World English

(Circa 1757–1804), American Federalist politician. He established the US central banking system, and advocated strong central government. He was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr

Nevsky, Alexander British & World English

See Alexander Nevsky.

Selkirk, Alexander British & World English

(1676–1721), Scottish sailor; also called Alexander Selcraig. While on a privateering expedition in 1704 Selkirk quarrelled with his captain and was put ashore, at his own request, on one of the uninhabited Juan Fernandez Islands, where he remained until 1709. His experiences formed the basis of Daniel Defoe’s novel Robinson Crusoe (1719)

Alexander Nevsky New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(c.1220–63), prince of Novgorod 1236–63; canonized as St Alexander Nevsky

Alexander Archipelago British & World English

A group of about 1,100 islands off the coast of SE Alaska

Alexander technique British & World English

A system designed to promote well-being by retraining one’s awareness and habits of posture to ensure minimum effort and strain

Archipenko, Alexander British & World English

(1887–1964), Russian-born American sculptor; full name Alexander Porfirevich Archipenko. He adapted cubist techniques to sculpture. Notable works: Walking Woman (1912)

Solzhenitsyn, Alexander British & World English

(1918–2008), Russian novelist; Russian name Aleksandr Isaevich Solzhenitsyn. He spent eight years in a labour camp for criticizing Stalin and began writing on his release. From 1963 his books were banned in the Soviet Union, and he was exiled in 1974, eventually returning to Russia in 1994. Notable works: One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1962) and The Gulag Archipelago (1973). Nobel Prize for Literature (1970)

Woollcott, Alexander British & World English

(1887–1943), US critic; full name Alexander Humpreys Woollcott. He was the drama critic for The New York Times (1914–22) and the New York World (1925–28) and also had a radio show called “Town Crier” (1929–42). The title character in The Man Who Came to Dinner (1939), a play by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman, was based on Woollcott

Alexander technique New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

system designed to improve posture

Korda, Sir Alexander British & World English

(1893–1956), Hungarian-born British film producer and director; born Sándor Kellner. He produced The Third Man (1949) and produced and directed The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933)

Bell, Alexander Graham British & World English

(1847–1922), Scottish-born American scientist. He invented a method for transmitting speech electrically and gave the first public demonstration of the telephone in 1876; he founded the Bell Telephone Company the following year

Fleming, Sir Alexander British & World English

(1881–1955), Scottish bacteriologist. In 1928, Fleming discovered the effect of penicillin on bacteria. Twelve years later Howard Florey and Ernst Chain established its therapeutic use as an antibiotic. Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine (1945, shared with Florey and Chain)

Humboldt, Alexander von British & World English

Baron (1769–1859), German explorer and scientist; full name Friedrich Heinrich Alexander von Humboldt. He travelled in Central and South America (1799–1804) and wrote on natural history, meteorology, and physical geography

Mackenzie, Sir Alexander1 British & World English

(1764–1820), Scottish explorer of Canada. He explored the Mackenzie River in 1789 and in 1793 became the first European to reach the Pacific Ocean by land along a northern route

Mackenzie, Sir Alexander2 British & World English

(1822–92), Canadian Liberal statesman; born in Scotland; prime minister 1873–78

Lindemann, Frederick Alexander British & World English

See Cherwell, 1st Viscount.

Macdonald, Sir John Alexander British & World English

(1815–91), Scottish-born Canadian statesman, Prime Minister 1867–73 and 1878–91. He played a leading role in the confederation of the Canadian provinces, and was appointed first Prime Minister of the Dominion of Canada

Alexander I in Alexander2 British & World English

Alexander I (circa 1077–1124), son of Malcolm III, reigned 1107–24

Alexander II in Alexander2 British & World English

Alexander II (1198–1249), son of William I of Scotland, reigned 1214–49

Alexander I in Alexander3 British & World English

Alexander I (1777–1825), reigned 1801–25

Alexander II in Alexander3 British & World English

Alexander II (1818–81), son of Nicholas I, reigned 1855–81; known as Alexander the Liberator. His reforms included limited emancipation of the serfs

Alexander III in Alexander2 British & World English

Alexander III (1241–86), son of Alexander II, reigned 1249–86

Alexander III in Alexander3 British & World English

Alexander III (1845–94), son of Alexander II, reigned 1881–94. He reversed many of his father’s reforms, resulting in a dangerous situation in Russia

Alexander Selcraig in Selkirk, Alexander British & World English

(1676–1721), Scottish sailor; also called Alexander Selcraig. While on a privateering expedition in 1704 Selkirk quarrelled with his captain and was put ashore, at his own request, on one of the uninhabited Juan Fernandez Islands, where he remained until 1709. His experiences formed the basis of Daniel Defoe’s novel Robinson Crusoe (1719)

Henson, Matthew British & World English

(1866–1955), US explorer; full name Matthew Alexander Henson. He accompanied Robert Peary as his valet when their party became the first to reach the North Pole in 1909. He wrote A Negro Explorer at the North Pole (1912)

Alexander the Great in Alexander1 British & World English

(356–323 bc), king of Macedon 336–323, son of Philip II; known as Alexander the Great. He conquered Persia, Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia, Bactria, and the Punjab; in Egypt he founded the city of Alexandria

St Alexander Nevsky in Alexander Nevsky British & World English

(Circa 1220–63), prince of Novgorod 1236–63; canonized as St Alexander Nevsky. He defeated the Swedes on the banks of the River Neva in 1240. Feast day, 30 August or 23 November

Alan Alexander Milne in Milne, A. A. British & World English

(1882–1956), English writer for children; full name Alan Alexander Milne. He created the character of the toy bear Winnie-the-Pooh in stories written for his son Christopher Robin (1920–96), published in Winnie-the-Pooh (1926) and The House at Pooh Corner (1928)

Alexander the Great in Alexander New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(356–323 bc), king of Macedon 336–323; known as Alexander the Great

St Alexander Nevsky in Alexander Nevsky New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(c.1220–63), prince of Novgorod 1236–63; canonized as St Alexander Nevsky

Button, Jenson British & World English

(B.1980), English motor-racing driver; full name Jenson Alexander Lyons Button. He won the Formula One world championship in 2009

Haley, Alex British & World English

(1921–92), US writer; full name Alexander Murray Palmer Haley. His best-selling work Roots: The Saga of an American Family (1976) chronicled the ancestors of his African-American family. The book and subsequent television miniseries in 1977 each won a Pulitzer Prize. He also coauthored The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965) and wrote Queen (published posthumously, 1993)


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