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Darwin British & World English

The capital of Northern Territory, Australia; population 120,652 (2008)

Darwin1 New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

capital of Northern Territory, Australia

Darwin2 New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

Charles (Robert) (1809–82), English natural historian

Darwin, Charles British & World English

(1809–82), English natural historian and geologist, proponent of the theory of evolution by natural selection; full name Charles Robert Darwin. Darwin was the naturalist on HMS Beagle for her voyage around the southern hemisphere (1831-6), during which he collected the material which became the basis for his ideas on natural selection. His works On the Origin of Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871) had a fundamental effect on our concepts of nature and humanity’s place within it

Darwin, Erasmus British & World English

(1731–1802), English physician, scientist, inventor, and poet. Darwin is chiefly remembered for his scientific and technical writing, much of which appeared in the form of long poems. These include Zoonomia (1794–96), which proposed a Lamarckian view of evolution. He was the grandfather of Charles Darwin and Francis Galton

Darwin's finches British & World English

A group of songbirds related to the buntings and found on the Galapagos Islands, discovered by Charles Darwin and used by him to illustrate his theory of natural selection. They are believed to have evolved from a common ancestor and have developed a variety of bills to suit various modes of life

Charles Robert Darwin in Darwin, Charles British & World English

(1809–82), English natural historian and geologist, proponent of the theory of evolution by natural selection; full name Charles Robert Darwin. Darwin was the naturalist on HMS Beagle for her voyage around the southern hemisphere (1831-6), during which he collected the material which became the basis for his ideas on natural selection. His works On the Origin of Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871) had a fundamental effect on our concepts of nature and humanity’s place within it