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Harold British & World English

The name of two kings of England:

Harold I New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(d.1040), king of England 1037–40; known as Harold Harefoot

Harold II New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(c.1019–66), king of England 1066

Lloyd, Harold British & World English

(1893–1971), American film comedian; full name Harold Clayton Lloyd. Performing his own hair-raising stunts, he used physical danger as a source of comedy in silent movies such as High and Dizzy (1920), Safety Last (1923), and The Freshman (1925)

Pinter, Harold British & World English

(1930–2008), English dramatist, actor, and director. His plays are associated with the Theatre of the Absurd and are typically marked by a sense of menace. Notable plays: The Birthday Party (1958), The Caretaker (1960), and Party Time (1991). Nobel Prize for Literature (2005)

Wilson, Harold British & World English

Baron Wilson of Rievaulx (1916–95), British Labour statesman, Prime Minister 1964–70 and 1974-6; full name James Harold Wilson. In both terms of office he faced severe economic problems. His government introduced a number of social reforms, including comprehensive schooling, and renegotiated Britain’s terms of entry into the European Economic Community, which was confirmed after a referendum in 1975

Abrahams, Harold British & World English

(1899–1978), English athlete; full name Harold Maurice Abrahams. In 1924 he became the first Englishman to win the 100 metres in the Olympic Games. His story was the subject of the film Chariots of Fire (1981)

Larwood, Harold British & World English

(1904–95), English cricketer. A fast bowler for Nottinghamshire, in the 1932-3 MCC tour of Australia he bowled fast short-pitched ‘bodyline’ deliveries, and was involved in controversy when several of the home batsmen were badly injured

Robbins, Harold British & World English

(1916–97), American novelist, author of best-sellers such as The Carpetbaggers (1961) and The Betsy (1971)

Alexander, Harold British & World English

1st Earl Alexander of Tunis (1891–1969), British Field Marshal and Conservative statesman, holding commands during the Second World War; full name Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander

Macmillan, Harold British & World English

1st Earl of Stockton (1894–1986), British Conservative statesman, Prime Minister 1957–63; full name Maurice Harold Macmillan. His term of office saw the signing of the Test-Ban Treaty (1963) with the US and the USSR. Macmillan resigned on grounds of ill health shortly after the scandal surrounding John Profumo

Burton, Harold Hitz British & World English

(1888–1964), US Supreme Court associate justice 1945–58. He was the mayor of Cleveland, Ohio 1935–40 and a US senator 1941–45 before being appointed to the Court by President Truman

Ickes, Harold LeClair British & World English

(1874–1952) US lawyer and public official. He served as head of the federal Public Works Administration 1933–39 and as US secretary of the interior 1933–46

Urey, Harold Clayton British & World English

(1893–1981), American chemist. He discovered deuterium in 1932, pioneered the use of isotope labelling, and became director of the Manhattan Project at Columbia University. Nobel Prize for Chemistry (1934)

Harold I in Harold British & World English

Harold I (d.1040), reigned 1037–40; known as Harold Harefoot. An illegitimate son of Canute, he acted as regent on his father’s death in 1035 owing to the absence in Denmark of Hardecanute (King of Denmark and Canute’s legitimate heir) and became king two years later

Harold II in Harold British & World English

Harold II (circa 1019–66), reigned 1066, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England. Succeeding Edward the Confessor, he was faced with two invasions within months of his accession. He resisted his half-brother Tostig and the Norse king Harald Hardrada at Stamford Bridge, but was killed and his army defeated by William of Normandy at the Battle of Hastings

Paar, Jack British & World English

(1918–2004), US television personality; full name Jack Harold Paar. He was host of The Tonight Show 1957–62 (officially The Jack Paar Show from 1959)

Prince, Hal British & World English

(1928-) US theatrical producer and director; full name Harold Smith Prince. Among the shows that he produced were Pajama Game (1954), West Side Story (1957), Fiorello (1959), and Fiddler on the Roof (1964). Some that he also directed included Cabaret (1966), Evita (1978), and Phantom of the Opera (1988)

Harold Harefoot in Harold British & World English

Harold I (d.1040), reigned 1037–40; known as Harold Harefoot. An illegitimate son of Canute, he acted as regent on his father’s death in 1035 owing to the absence in Denmark of Hardecanute (King of Denmark and Canute’s legitimate heir) and became king two years later

Harold Harefoot in Harold I New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(d.1040), king of England 1037–40; known as Harold Harefoot

Grange, Red British & World English

(1903–91), US football player; born Harold Edward Grange; known as the Galloping Ghost. He played professionally, mostly with the Chicago Bears, from 1925 until he retired in 1934. Football Hall of Fame (1963)

Maslow, Abraham British & World English

(1908–70), US psychologist; full name Abraham Harold Maslow. A leader of the humanistic school of psychology, he postulated a “hierarchy of needs” to explain human motivation, and proposed "self-actualization." He wrote Motivation and Personality (1954)

Harold Hart Crane in Crane, Hart British & World English

(1899–1932), American poet; full name Harold Hart Crane. He published only two books before committing suicide: the collection White Buildings (1926) and The Bridge (1930), a mystical epic poem concerned with American life and consciousness

Jack Harold Paar in Paar, Jack British & World English

(1918–2004), US television personality; full name Jack Harold Paar. He was host of The Tonight Show 1957–62 (officially The Jack Paar Show from 1959)

Harold Edward Grange in Grange, Red British & World English

(1903–91), US football player; born Harold Edward Grange; known as the Galloping Ghost. He played professionally, mostly with the Chicago Bears, from 1925 until he retired in 1934. Football Hall of Fame (1963)

Harold Walter Kroto in Kroto, Sir Harry British & World English

(B.1939), English chemist; full name Harold Walter Kroto. He discovered the spherical carbon molecule known as the fullerene, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry (1996; shared with Robert F. Curl (b.1933) and Richard E. Smalley (b.1943))

Harold Clayton Lloyd in Lloyd, Harold British & World English

(1893–1971), American film comedian; full name Harold Clayton Lloyd. Performing his own hair-raising stunts, he used physical danger as a source of comedy in silent movies such as High and Dizzy (1920), Safety Last (1923), and The Freshman (1925)

Abraham Harold Maslow in Maslow, Abraham British & World English

(1908–70), US psychologist; full name Abraham Harold Maslow. A leader of the humanistic school of psychology, he postulated a “hierarchy of needs” to explain human motivation, and proposed "self-actualization." He wrote Motivation and Personality (1954)

Herman Harold Potok in Potok, Chaim British & World English

(1929–2002), US writer, theologian, and rabbi; born Herman Harold Potok. His novels include The Chosen (1967), The Book of Lights (1981), and I Am the Clay (1992). He also wrote nonfiction and plays

Harold Smith Prince in Prince, Hal British & World English

(1928-) US theatrical producer and director; full name Harold Smith Prince. Among the shows that he produced were Pajama Game (1954), West Side Story (1957), Fiorello (1959), and Fiddler on the Roof (1964). Some that he also directed included Cabaret (1966), Evita (1978), and Phantom of the Opera (1988)

James Harold Wilson in Wilson, Harold British & World English

Baron Wilson of Rievaulx (1916–95), British Labour statesman, Prime Minister 1964–70 and 1974-6; full name James Harold Wilson. In both terms of office he faced severe economic problems. His government introduced a number of social reforms, including comprehensive schooling, and renegotiated Britain’s terms of entry into the European Economic Community, which was confirmed after a referendum in 1975

Harold Maurice Abrahams in Abrahams, Harold British & World English

(1899–1978), English athlete; full name Harold Maurice Abrahams. In 1924 he became the first Englishman to win the 100 metres in the Olympic Games. His story was the subject of the film Chariots of Fire (1981)

Maurice Harold Macmillan in Macmillan, Harold British & World English

1st Earl of Stockton (1894–1986), British Conservative statesman, Prime Minister 1957–63; full name Maurice Harold Macmillan. His term of office saw the signing of the Test-Ban Treaty (1963) with the US and the USSR. Macmillan resigned on grounds of ill health shortly after the scandal surrounding John Profumo

Harold Adrian Russell Philby in Philby, Kim British & World English

(1912–88), British Foreign Office official and spy; born Harold Adrian Russell Philby. While working at the British Embassy in Washington DC (1949–51), Philby was asked to resign on suspicion of being a Soviet agent, although there was no firm evidence to this effect. He defected to the USSR in 1963 and was officially revealed to have spied for the Soviets from 1933

Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander in Alexander, Harold British & World English

1st Earl Alexander of Tunis (1891–1969), British Field Marshal and Conservative statesman, holding commands during the Second World War; full name Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander


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