Dictionary search results

Showing 1-50 of 125 results

deep British & World English

Extending far down from the top or surface

deep English Thesaurus

a deep ravine

go deep British & World English

(Of emotions, beliefs, etc.) be strongly and wholeheartedly felt or held

in deep British & World English

Inextricably involved in or committed to a situation

dig deep British & World English

Use one’s physical, mental, or financial resources

deep-dish British & World English

(Of a pie) baked in a deep dish to allow for a large filling

deep-dyed British & World English

Thoroughgoing; complete

deep-fry British & World English

Fry (food) in an amount of fat or oil sufficient to cover it completely

deep kiss British & World English

A kiss involving insertion of the tongue into the partner’s mouth

deep-laid British & World English

(Of a scheme) elaborate and secret

deep sea British & World English

The deeper parts of the ocean, especially those beyond the edge of the continental shelf

deep-set British & World English

Embedded or positioned firmly or deeply

deep-six British & World English

Destroy or dispose of (something) irretrievably

deep time British & World English

The multimillion year time frame within which scientists believe the earth has existed, and which is supported by the observation of natural, mostly geological, phenomena

Deep Web British & World English

The part of the World Wide Web that is not discoverable by means of standard search engines, including password-protected or dynamic pages and encrypted networks

knee-deep British & World English

Of or at a depth or height to reach the knees

skin-deep British & World English

Not deep or lasting; superficial

skin-deep English Thesaurus

their left-wing attitudes were only skin-deep

ankle-deep British & World English

Of or at a depth or height to reach the ankles

deep-bodied British & World English

(Of an animal, especially a fish) having a body which is deeper (from back to belly) than it is wide

deep-cycle British & World English

Denoting a type of electric battery that can be totally discharged and recharged several times

deep-drawn British & World English

(Of metal) shaped by being forced through a die when cold

deep freeze British & World English

A refrigerator in which food can be quickly frozen and kept for long periods at a very low temperature

deep-mined British & World English

(Of coal) obtained from far below the surface of the ground, not from opencast mines

deep-rooted British & World English

Firmly embedded in thought, behaviour, or culture, and so having a persistent influence

deep-seated British & World English

Firmly established at a deep or profound level

Deep South British & World English

The south-eastern region of the US regarded as embodying traditional Southern culture and traditions

deep space British & World English

Another term for outer space.

deep throat British & World English

A person who anonymously supplies information about covert or illegal action in the organization where they work

deep-toned British & World English

(Of sound) having a low-pitched, deep tone

drink deep British & World English

Take a large draught or draughts of something

waist-deep British & World English

Of or at a depth to reach the waist

deep-rooted English Thesaurus

a fear of deep-rooted taboos

deep-coloured British & World English

Of a dark and intense colour or shade

deep-discount British & World English

Denoting financial securities carrying a low rate of interest relative to prevailing market rates and issued at a discount to their redemption value, so mainly providing capital gain rather than income

deep ecology British & World English

An environmental movement and philosophy which regards human life as just one of many equal components of a global ecosystem

deep mourning British & World English

A state of mourning, conventionally expressed by wearing only black clothing

deep-mouthed British & World English

(Of a dog) having a deep-sounding bark

deep pockets British & World English

Used to refer to the possession of abundant financial resources

Challenger Deep British & World English

The deepest part (11,034 m, 36,201 ft) of the Mariana Trench in the North Pacific, discovered by HMS Challenger II in 1948

the deep end British & World English

The end of a swimming pool where the water is deepest

deep breathing British & World English

The action of breathing deeply, especially as a method of relaxation

deep structure British & World English

(In transformational grammar) the underlying logical relationships of the elements of a phrase or sentence


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