Dictionary search results

Showing 1-50 of 134 results

fine1 British & World English

Of very high quality; very good of its kind

fine2 British & World English

A sum of money exacted as a penalty by a court of law or other authority

fine3 British & World English

French brandy of high quality made from distilled wine rather than from pomace

fine4 British & World English

(In musical directions) the place where a piece of music finishes (when this is not at the end of the score but at the end of an earlier section which is repeated at the end of the piece)

fine1 English Thesaurus

fine wines

fine2 English Thesaurus

if convicted they face heavy fines

a pretty kettle of fish British & World English

An awkward state of affairs

in fine British & World English

Finally; in short; to sum up

fine art British & World English

Creative art, especially visual art whose products are to be appreciated primarily or solely for their imaginative, aesthetic, or intellectual content

fine-draw British & World English

Sew together (two pieces of cloth or edges of a tear) so that the join is imperceptible

Fine Gael British & World English

One of the two major political parties of the Republic of Ireland (the other being Fianna Fáil). Founded in 1923 as Cumann na nGaedheal, it changed its name in 1933. It has advocated the concept of a united Ireland achieved by peaceful means

fine leg British & World English

A fielding position behind the batsman on the leg side, between long leg and square leg

fine-spun British & World English

(Especially of fabric) fine or delicate in texture

fine-tune British & World English

Make small adjustments to (something) in order to achieve the best or a desired performance

Fine Gael New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

political party in the Republic of Ireland

fine-drawn British & World English

Extremely thin

fine-edged British & World English

(Of a knife or tool) having a sharp cutting edge

fine print British & World English

Another term for small print.

ultra-fine British & World English

Extremely fine in size, texture, composition, etc.

fine-grained British & World English

(Chiefly of wood) having a fine or delicate arrangement of fibres

cut it fine British & World English

Allow a very small margin of something, especially time

a fine line British & World English

A subtle distinction between two concepts or situations

one fine day British & World English

At some unspecified or unknown time

fine champagne British & World English

Brandy from the Champagne district of the Cognac region of which half or more of the content comes from the central Grande Champagne

fine chemicals British & World English

Chemical substances prepared to a very high degree of purity for use in research and industry

fine structure British & World English

The composition of an object, substance, or energy phenomenon as viewed on a small scale and in considerable detail

fine champagne New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

brandy from the Champagne district

fine up in fine1 British & World English

(Of the weather) become bright and clear

do someone fine British & World English

Suit or be enough for someone

fine-tooth comb British & World English

A comb with narrow teeth that are close together

ja well no fine British & World English

Used to express a non-committal, resigned, or ironical attitude

fine needle aspiration British & World English

A procedure in which a thin needle is used to draw cells or fluid from a lump or mass under the skin

fine-structure constant British & World English

A fundamental and dimensionless physical constant, equal to approximately 1137, which occurs in expressions describing the fine structure of atomic spectra

fine feathers make fine birds British & World English

Beautiful or expensive clothes may make the wearer seem more impressive than is really the case

fine words butter no parsnips British & World English

Nothing is achieved by empty promises or flattery

chance would be a fine thing British & World English

Expressing a speaker’s belief that something is desirable but the opportunity is unlikely to arise

fine arts in fine art British & World English

Creative art, especially visual art whose products are to be appreciated primarily or solely for their imaginative, aesthetic, or intellectual content

have something down to a fine art British & World English

Achieve a high level of skill or accomplishment in a particular activity through experience

cut it fine in fine1 British & World English

Allow a very small margin of something, especially time

do someone fine in fine1 British & World English

Suit or be enough for someone

a fine line in fine1 British & World English

A subtle distinction between two concepts or situations


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