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hole British & World English

A hollow place in a solid body or surface

hole English Thesaurus

there was a hole in the roof where the tiles had fallen away

f-hole British & World English

Either of a pair of soundholes resembling an ∫ and a reversed ∫ in shape, cut in the front of musical instruments of the violin family, and some other stringed instruments such as semi-acoustic electric guitars or mandolins

f-hole New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

f-shaped soundhole in violin, guitar, etc.

hole up British & World English

Hide oneself

coal-hole British & World English

A compartment or small cellar used for storing coal

dry hole British & World English

A well drilled for oil or gas but yielding none

hole out British & World English

(Of a batsman) hit the ball to a fielder and be caught

hole card British & World English

(In stud poker) a card which has been dealt face down

hole saw British & World English

A tool for making circular holes, consisting of a metal cylinder with a toothed edge

lick hole British & World English

A salt lick, or a place where a block of salt is placed for stock to lick

pie hole British & World English

A person’s mouth

piss-hole British & World English

A squalid place

pop-hole British & World English

A hole in a fence or divider through which animals can pass, especially one allowing poultry access to the outside or allowing piglets access to the sow

rock hole British & World English

A natural depression in a rock in which rainwater collects

shot hole British & World English

A hole made by the passage of a shot

snow hole British & World English

A hole in snow used as a temporary shelter, typically one made for the purpose

top-hole British & World English

Excellent; first-rate

black hole British & World English

A region of space having a gravitational field so intense that no matter or radiation can escape

finger hole British & World English

A hole in a wind instrument that may be covered or left open to change pitch when playing

glory hole British & World English

An untidy room or cupboard used for storage

hidey-hole British & World English

A place for hiding something or oneself in, especially as a retreat from other people

hole punch British & World English

A device for punching holes in sheets of paper, so that they can be filed in a ring binder

kettle hole British & World English

A hollow, typically filled by a lake, resulting from the melting of a mass of ice trapped in glacial deposits

melon hole British & World English

Another term for gilgai.

memory hole British & World English

An imaginary place where inconvenient or unpleasant information is put and quickly forgotten

ozone hole British & World English

A region of marked thinning of the ozone layer in high latitudes, chiefly in winter, attributed to the chemical action of CFCs and other atmospheric pollutants. The resulting increase in ultraviolet light at ground level gives rise to an increased risk of skin cancer

pilot hole British & World English

A small hole drilled ahead of a full-sized hole as a guide

rabbit hole British & World English

A rabbit’s burrow

shake hole British & World English

Another term for sinkhole.

spider hole British & World English

A trench or indentation used by a spider for rest or ambush

touch hole British & World English

A small hole in early firearms through which the charge is ignited

white hole British & World English

A hypothetical celestial object which expands outwards from a space-time singularity and emits energy, in the manner of a time-reversed black hole

Woods Hole British & World English

A village in Falmouth in southeastern Massachusetts, at the southwest corner of Cape Cod, a resort and noted ocean research center

doughnut hole British & World English

A small ball-shaped doughnut

Jackson Hole British & World English

A valley on the Snake River in northwestern Wyoming, partly in Grand Teton National Park, home to a fashionable resort

priest's hole British & World English

A hiding place for a Roman Catholic priest during times of religious persecution

swallow hole British & World English

Another term for sinkhole.

swimming hole British & World English

A bathing place in a stream or river

through-hole British & World English

(Of an electronic component) having leads which are designed to go through holes to the other side of a circuit board for soldering

watering hole British & World English

A waterhole from which animals regularly drink

hole-in-one British & World English

A shot that enters the hole from the tee with no intervening shots

nineteenth hole British & World English

The bar in a golf clubhouse, as reached after a standard round of eighteen holes

blow a hole in British & World English

Ruin the effectiveness of

make a hole in British & World English

Use a large amount of

hole-and-corner British & World English

Attempting to avoid public notice; secret

hole in the wall British & World English

An automatic cash dispenser installed in the outside wall of a bank


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