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little British & World English

Small in size, amount, or degree (often used to convey an appealing diminutiveness or express an affectionate or condescending attitude)

no better than British & World English

Just (or almost) the same as (something bad); merely

no wonder British & World English

It is not surprising

there's no love lost between British & World English

There is mutual dislike between (the people mentioned)

in little British & World English

On a small scale; in miniature

some little British & World English

A considerable amount of

little auk British & World English

A small, stubby short-billed auk (seabird) with black plumage and white underparts, breeding in the Arctic

Little Bear British & World English

The constellation Ursa Minor

little end British & World English

(In a piston engine) the smaller end of the connecting rod, attached to the piston

Little Gem British & World English

A small compact lettuce of a variety of the cos type

little man British & World English

A person who conducts business or life on a small or ordinary scale; an average person

Little Ouse British & World English

Another name for Ouse444.

little owl British & World English

A small owl with speckled plumage, native to Eurasia and Africa and introduced to Britain

Little Rock British & World English

The state capital of Arkansas; population 189,515 (est. 2008)

little slam British & World English

Another term for small slam.

little toe British & World English

The smallest toe, on the outer side of the foot

Little Ararat British & World English

See Ararat, Mount.

Little Dipper British & World English

The seven bright stars of the constellation Ursa Minor

little finger British & World English

The smallest finger, at the outer side of the hand, furthest from the thumb

little grebe British & World English

A small, dumpy Old World grebe with a short neck and bill and a trilling call

little hours British & World English

(In the Western Church) the offices of prime, terce, sext, and none

Little League British & World English

Organized baseball played by children aged between 8 and 12

little people British & World English

The ordinary people in a country, organization, etc. who do not have much power

Little Rhody British & World English

Informal name for Rhode Island.

Little Tibet British & World English

Another name for Baltistan.

Little Turtle British & World English

(C.1752–1812), American Indian leader, chief of the Miami. He was successful in raids on settlers in the Northwest Territory until several defeats forced him to sign the Treaty of Greenville (Ohio) in 1795

Chicken Little British & World English

An alarmist or person who panics easily

precious little British & World English

Extremely little or few (used for emphasis)

not a little British & World English

A great deal (of); much

Little Corporal British & World English

A nickname for Napoleon

Little Masters British & World English

A group of 16th-century Nuremberg engravers, followers of Dürer, who worked small-dimension plates with biblical, mythological, and genre scenes

Little Russian British & World English

Former term for Ukrainian.

little theatre British & World English

A small independent theatre used for experimental or avant-garde drama, or for community, non-commercial productions

little by little British & World English

By degrees; gradually

make little of British & World English

Treat as unimportant

quite a little British & World English

A fairly large amount of

Little Englander British & World English

A person who opposes an international role or policy for England (or, in practice, for Britain)

little ice age British & World English

A period of colder climate and increased glaciation occurring between warmer periods, in particular one such period which reached its peak during the 17th century

little short of British & World English

Almost (or equal to); little (or nothing) less than

the little woman British & World English

A condescending way of referring to one’s wife

little black dress British & World English

A woman’s short or medium-length black dress suitable for almost any social engagement

little green man British & World English

An imaginary or hypothetical being from outer space

North Little Rock British & World English

A city in central Arkansas, an industrial center across the Arkansas River from Little Rock; population 59,430 (est. 2008)

in little in little British & World English

On a small scale; in miniature

quite the little —— British & World English

Used as a condescending or ironic recognition that someone has a particular quality or accomplishment


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