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out-take British & World English

A scene, sequence, or song filmed or recorded for a film, programme, or record album but not included in the final version

take it out of British & World English

Exhaust the strength of (someone)

take someone out British & World English

Escort someone to a social event or place of entertainment

take something out British & World English

Obtain an official document or service

take-out double British & World English

A double which, by convention, requires one’s partner to bid, used to convey information rather than to score penalty points

take a bite out of British & World English

Reduce by a significant amount

take something out on British & World English

Relieve frustration or anger by attacking or mistreating (a person or thing not responsible for such feelings)

take someone out in take British & World English

Escort someone to a social event or place of entertainment

take someone/thing out in take British & World English

Kill, destroy, or disable someone or something

take something out in take British & World English

Obtain an official document or service

take the easy way out British & World English

Extricate oneself from a difficult situation by choosing the simplest rather than the most honourable course of action

take the starch out of British & World English

Deflate or humiliate (someone)

take someone/thing out British & World English

Kill, destroy, or disable someone or something

take it out of in take British & World English

Exhaust the strength of (someone)

take something out on in take British & World English

Relieve frustration or anger by attacking or mistreating (a person or thing not responsible for such feelings)

take British & World English

Accompany or guide (someone) to a specified place

take someone out of themselves British & World English

Make a person forget their worries

take the bread out of people's mouths British & World English

Deprive people of their livings by competition or unfair working practices

take a leaf out of someone's book British & World English

Imitate or emulate someone in a particular way

take the wind out of someone's sails British & World English

Frustrate someone by unexpectedly anticipating an action or remark

take the words out of someone's mouth British & World English

Say what someone else was about to say

take a bite out of in bite British & World English

Reduce by a significant amount

get a rise out of in rise British & World English

Provoke an angry or irritated response from (someone), especially by teasing

take the easy way out in easy British & World English

Extricate oneself from a difficult situation by choosing the simplest rather than the most honourable course of action

take someone out of themselves in take British & World English

Make a person forget their worries

knock the stuffing out of in stuffing British & World English

Severely impair the confidence or strength of (someone)

take the piss in piss British & World English

Mock someone or something

time out British & World English

Time for rest or recreation away from one’s usual work or studies

take the starch out of in starch British & World English

Deflate or humiliate (someone)

take a leaf out of someone's book in book British & World English

Imitate or emulate someone in a particular way

patent British & World English

A government authority or licence conferring a right or title for a set period, especially the sole right to exclude others from making, using, or selling an invention

loan1 British & World English

A thing that is borrowed, especially a sum of money that is expected to be paid back with interest

take the wind out of someone's sails in wind1 British & World English

Frustrate someone by unexpectedly anticipating an action or remark

take the words out of someone's mouth in word British & World English

Say what someone else was about to say

get a rise out of British & World English

Provoke an angry or irritated response from (someone), especially by teasing

take the bread out of people's mouths in bread British & World English

Deprive people of their livings by competition or unfair working practices

sting British & World English

A hurtful quality or effect

heat British & World English

Intensity of feeling, especially of anger or excitement

take the piss British & World English

Mock someone or something

knock the stuffing out of British & World English

Severely impair the confidence or strength of (someone)

take the bread out of or from people's mouths in bread British & World English

Deprive people of their livings by competition or unfair working practices

out-take New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

section recorded but not included in the final version

take out of English-Spanish

sacar* de

take out on English-Spanish

she takes her frustration out on her children

take out of English-Spanish

sacar* de

take out on English-Spanish

she takes her frustration out on her children


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