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out-take British & World English

A scene, sequence, or song filmed or recorded for a film, programme, or record album but not included in the final version

take it out of British & World English

Exhaust the strength of (someone)

take someone out British & World English

Escort someone to a social event or place of entertainment

take something out British & World English

Obtain an official document or service

take-out double British & World English

A double which, by convention, requires one’s partner to bid, used to convey information rather than to score penalty points

take a bite out of British & World English

Reduce by a significant amount

take something out on British & World English

Relieve frustration or anger by attacking or mistreating (a person or thing not responsible for such feelings)

take the easy way out British & World English

Extricate oneself from a difficult situation by choosing the simplest rather than the most honourable course of action

take the starch out of British & World English

Deflate or humiliate (someone)

take someone/thing out British & World English

Kill, destroy, or disable someone or something

take someone out of themselves British & World English

Make a person forget their worries

take a leaf out of someone's book British & World English

Imitate or emulate someone in a particular way

take the bread out of people's mouths British & World English

Deprive people of their livings by competition or unfair working practices

take the wind out of someone's sails British & World English

Frustrate someone by unexpectedly anticipating an action or remark

take the words out of someone's mouth British & World English

Say what someone else was about to say

take it out of in take British & World English

Exhaust the strength of (someone)

take it out of in take English Thesaurus

I'd had no idea how much hauling one of those things around would take it out of you

take someone out in take English Thesaurus

the very first night he took her out, Frank proposed to her

take something out in take English Thesaurus

that tooth will need to be taken out

take a bite out of in bite British & World English

Reduce by a significant amount

take the easy way out in easy British & World English

Extricate oneself from a difficult situation by choosing the simplest rather than the most honourable course of action

take someone/something out in take English Thesaurus

they were taken out by a sniper

take a leaf out of someone's book in book British & World English

Imitate or emulate someone in a particular way

take the bread out of or from people's mouths in bread British & World English

Deprive people of their livings by competition or unfair working practices

take the wind out of someone's sails in wind1 British & World English

Frustrate someone by unexpectedly anticipating an action or remark