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pants British & World English

Underpants or knickers

pant British & World English

Breathe with short, quick breaths, typically from exertion or excitement

hot pants British & World English

Very tight, brief women’s shorts, worn as a fashion garment

ski pants British & World English

Trousers worn for skiing

tap pants British & World English

A pair of brief lingerie shorts, usually worn with a camisole top

capri pants British & World English

Close-fitting tapered trousers for women

cargo pants British & World English

Loose-fitting casual cotton trousers with large patch pockets halfway down each leg

fancy-pants British & World English

Superior or high-class in a pretentious way

half-pants British & World English

A pair of shorts

harem pants British & World English

Full, loose-fitting trousers made of a soft material that is gathered in closely at the ankle or lower leg, typically worn by women

snow pants British & World English

Insulated waterproof trousers worn for outdoor activities in the winter

yoga pants British & World English

Stretchy knit pants designed to be worn for yoga or other exercise

palazzo pants British & World English

Women’s loose wide-legged trousers

smarty-pants British & World English

Another term for smarty111.

stirrup pants British & World English

A pair of women’s stretch trousers having a band of elastic at the bottom of each leg which passes under the arch of the foot

cigarette pants British & World English

Women’s trousers with straight, very narrow legs

toreador pants British & World English

Women’s tight-fitting calf-length trousers

the ant's pants British & World English

An outstandingly good person or thing

beat the pants off British & World English

Prove to be vastly superior to

a kick in the pants British & World English

An unwelcome surprise that prompts fresh effort

pee oneself/one's pants in pee British & World English

Urinate involuntarily (often used to suggest loss of self-control through fear or hilarity)

piss oneself/one's pants in piss British & World English

Urinate involuntarily (often used hyperbolically to indicate hilarity or intense fear)

kick someone in the pants British & World English

Prompt someone to make fresh effort

scare the pants off someone British & World English

Make someone extremely scared (or bored etc.)

catch someone with their pants down British & World English

Catch someone in an embarrassingly unprepared state

fly by the seat of one's pants British & World English

Rely on instinct rather than logic or knowledge

the ant's pants in ant British & World English

An outstandingly good person or thing

loons British & World English

Close-fitting casual trousers widely flared from the knees downwards

loon pants in loons British & World English

Close-fitting casual trousers widely flared from the knees downwards

pantsuit British & World English

A trouser suit

trackpants British & World English

Tracksuit trousers

beat the pants off in beat British & World English

Prove to be vastly superior to

LeMay, Curtis Emerson British & World English

(1906–90), US air force officer; full name Curtis Emerson LeMay; known as Old Iron Pants. During World War II, he conducting a massive bombing campaign against Japan. After directing the Berlin Airlift in 1948, he was the commanding general of the US Strategic Air Command 1948–57 and Air Force chief of staff 1961–65

a kick in the pants in kick1 British & World English

An unwelcome surprise that prompts fresh effort

kick someone in the pants in kick1 British & World English

Prompt someone to make fresh effort

scare the pants off someone in pants British & World English

Make someone extremely scared (or bored etc.)

Old Iron Pants in LeMay, Curtis Emerson British & World English

(1906–90), US air force officer; full name Curtis Emerson LeMay; known as Old Iron Pants. During World War II, he conducting a massive bombing campaign against Japan. After directing the Berlin Airlift in 1948, he was the commanding general of the US Strategic Air Command 1948–57 and Air Force chief of staff 1961–65

catch someone with their pants down in pants British & World English

Catch someone in an embarrassingly unprepared state

fly by the seat of one's pants in pants British & World English

Rely on instinct rather than logic or knowledge

a kick in the pants or up the backside in kick1 British & World English

An unwelcome surprise that prompts fresh effort