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pull British & World English

Exert force on (someone or something) so as to cause movement towards oneself

pull English Thesaurus

he pulled a small plastic box towards him

make a face British & World English

Produce a facial expression that shows dislike or some other negative emotion, or that is intended to be amusing

get one's finger out British & World English

Cease prevaricating and start to act

draw in one's horns British & World English

Become less assertive or ambitious

tear someone/thing to pieces British & World English

Criticize someone or something harshly

bring someone up short British & World English

Make someone check or pause abruptly

pull in British & World English

(Of a vehicle) move to the side of or off the road

pull-in British & World English

A roadside cafe

pull up British & World English

(Of a vehicle) come to a halt

pull-up British & World English

An exercise involving raising oneself with one’s arms by pulling up against a horizontal bar fixed above one’s head

pull-on British & World English

(Of a garment) designed to be put on without the need to undo any fastenings

pull-up New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(hyphen, two words as verb)

bell pull British & World English

A cord or handle which rings a bell when pulled, typically used to summon someone from another room

leg-pull British & World English

A trick or practical joke

pull back British & World English

Retreat or cause troops to retreat from an area

pull out British & World English

Withdraw from an undertaking

pull-out British & World English

(Of a section of a magazine, newspaper, or other publication) designed to be detached and kept

pull over British & World English

(Of a vehicle) move to the side of or off the road

pull cord British & World English

A cord that operates a mechanism when pulled

pull-down British & World English

(Of a menu) appearing below a menu title only while selected

pull-off British & World English

An area on the side of a road where a motorist may park, typically in a scenic area

pull tab British & World English

North American term for ring pull.

push-pull British & World English

Operated by pushing and pulling

pull rank British & World English

Take unfair advantage of one’s seniority

ring pull British & World English

A ring on a can that is pulled to break the seal in order to open it

pull-out New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(hyphen, two words as verb)

demand-pull British & World English

Relating to or denoting inflation caused by an excess of demand over supply

pull round British & World English

Recover from an illness

pull-apart British & World English

Denoting an area that has been ruptured or stretched by tensional stresses or the resulting faulting

pull hitter British & World English

A hitter who normally strikes the ball in the direction in which they follow through

pull-quote British & World English

A brief, attention-catching quotation taken from the main text of an article and used as a subheading or graphic feature

taffy pull British & World English

A social occasion on which young people meet to make taffy

rough pull New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

proof pulled by hand on inferior paper for correction purposes

pull punches British & World English

Be less forceful, severe, or violent than one could be

pull strings British & World English

Make use of one’s influence and contacts to gain an advantage unofficially or unfairly

pull together British & World English

Cooperate in a task or undertaking

pull through British & World English

Get through an illness or other dangerous or difficult situation

pull a boner British & World English

Make a stupid mistake

pull the plug British & World English

Prevent something from happening or continuing

pull up stakes British & World English

Move or go to live elsewhere

pull at/on in pull British & World English

Inhale deeply while smoking (a pipe, cigarette, or cigar)

pull someone's leg British & World English

Deceive someone playfully; tease someone

pull the strings British & World English

Be in control of events or of other people’s actions

pull one's weight British & World English

Do one’s fair share of work

pull something off British & World English

Succeed in achieving or winning something difficult


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