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steel British & World English

A hard, strong grey or bluish-grey alloy of iron with carbon and usually other elements, used as a structural and fabricating material

steel English Thesaurus

his team were steeling themselves for disappointment

Steel, Danielle British & World English

(1947-), US writer, a prolific romance novelist. Her works include Changes (1983), Zoya (1988), The Ranch (1997), The Wedding (2000), and The House on Hope Street (2000)

lap steel British & World English

Another term for pedal steel.

cast steel British & World English

Steel that has been melted and cast in a mould, rather than worked while solid

cold steel British & World English

Weapons such as swords or knives collectively

mild steel British & World English

Steel which contains only a small percentage of carbon and is strong and easily worked but not readily tempered or hardened

pedal steel British & World English

A musical instrument played like the Hawaiian guitar, but set on a stand with pedals to adjust the tension of the strings

steel band British & World English

A band that plays music on steel drums

steel blue British & World English

A dark bluish-grey colour

steel drum British & World English

A percussion instrument originating in Trinidad, made out of an oil drum with one end beaten down and divided by grooves into sections to give different notes

steel grey British & World English

A dark purplish-grey colour

steel wool British & World English

Fine strands of steel matted together into a mass, used as an abrasive

tool steel British & World English

Hard steel of a quality used for making cutting tools

carbon steel British & World English

Steel in which the main alloying element is carbon

chrome steel British & World English

A hard fine-grained steel containing chromium, used for making tools

nickel steel British & World English

A type of stainless steel containing chromium and nickel

steel-plated British & World English

Covered or reinforced with steel

chromium steel British & World English

Another term for chrome steel.

Damascus steel British & World English

Steel given a wavy pattern by hammer-welding strips of steel and iron followed by repeated heating and forging, used chiefly for knife and sword blades. Such items were often marketed in Damascus during the medieval period

maraging steel British & World English

A steel alloy, containing up to 25 per cent nickel and other metals, strengthened by a process of slow cooling and age hardening

stainless steel British & World English

A form of steel containing chromium, resistant to tarnishing and rust

steel engraving British & World English

The process or action of engraving a design into a steel plate

vanadium steel British & World English

A strong alloy of steel containing vanadium

structural steel British & World English

Strong mild steel in shapes suited to construction work

have nerves of steel British & World English

Not be easily upset or frightened

European Coal and Steel Community British & World English

An organization established in 1952 to regulate pricing, transport, and tariffs for the coal and steel industries of the member countries

cold steel in cold British & World English

Weapons such as swords or knives collectively

steel pan in steel drum British & World English

A percussion instrument originating in Trinidad, made out of an oil drum with one end beaten down and divided by grooves into sections to give different notes

damask steel in damask British & World English

another term for Damascus steel.

have nerves of steel in nerve British & World English

Not be easily upset or frightened

pedal steel guitar in pedal steel British & World English

A musical instrument played like the Hawaiian guitar, but set on a stand with pedals to adjust the tension of the strings

steel oneself in steel English Thesaurus

his team were steeling themselves for disappointment

Henry Steel Olcott in theosophy British & World English

Any of a number of philosophies maintaining that a knowledge of God may be achieved through spiritual ecstasy, direct intuition, or special individual relations, especially the movement founded in 1875 as the Theosophical Society by Helena Blavatsky and Henry Steel Olcott (1832–1907)


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