Dictionary search results

Showing 1-50 of 446 results

white British & World English

Of the colour of milk or fresh snow, due to the reflection of all visible rays of light; the opposite of black

White in white British & World English

Belonging to or denoting a human group having light-coloured skin (chiefly used of peoples of European extraction)

White, Byron Raymond British & World English

(1917–2002), US Supreme Court associate justice 1962–93. Appointed to the Court by President Kennedy, he was considered a moderate, or centrist, and was often the swing vote when the Court was evenly divided. Before becoming a lawyer in 1946, he played professional football and studied at Oxford University as a Rhodes scholar

White, E. B. British & World English

(1899–1985), US writer; full name Elwyn Brooks White. He was a chief contributor to The New Yorker magazine from 1926 and Harper’s magazine 1938–43 and the author of the children’s classics Stuart Little (1945), Charlotte’s Web (1952), and The Trumpet of the Swan (1970). White is also known for his 1959 revision of William Strunk Jr’s. The Elements of Style

White, Edward Douglass British & World English

Jr. (1845–1921), US chief justice 1910–21. Before being appointed to the Court as an associate justice 1894–1910 by President Cleveland, he served as a US senator from Louisiana 1891–94. Appointed chief justice by President Taft, he was the first associate justice to go on to that higher post. He was noted for his work on antitrust legislation

White, Gilbert British & World English

(1720–93), English clergyman and naturalist. He wrote many letters to friends on aspects of natural history in his native village of Selborne, Hampshire; these were published in 1789 as The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, which has remained in print ever since

White, Patrick British & World English

(1912–90), Australian novelist, born in Britain; full name Patrick Victor Martindale White. White’s reputation is chiefly based on the two novels The Tree of Man (1955) and Voss (1957). Nobel Prize for Literature (1973)

White, T. H. British & World English

(1906–64), British novelist, born in India; full name Terence Hanbury White. He is best known for the tetralogy The Once and Future King, his reworking of the Arthurian legend that began with The Sword in the Stone (1937)

White, Theodore H. British & World English

(1915–86), US journalist and historian. He is best known for The Making of the President 1960 (Pulitzer Prize, 1962). Other works include In Search of History (1978) and America in Search of Itself (1982)

bleed someone/something dry British & World English

Drain someone or something of wealth or resources

egg white British & World English

The clear, viscous substance round the yolk of an egg that turns white when cooked or beaten

off-white British & World English

A white colour with a grey or yellowish tinge

non-white British & World English

Denoting or relating to a person whose origin is not predominantly European

white out in white British & World English

(Of vision) become impaired by exposure to sudden bright light

white out British & World English

(Of vision) become impaired by exposure to sudden bright light

white ant British & World English

another term for termite.

white bat British & World English

A bat with white fur found mainly in Central America

white-eye British & World English

A small Old World songbird with a ring of white feathers around the eye

white hat British & World English

Used in reference to a good or moral person, especially the hero in a film, novel, or play

white-hot British & World English

At white heat

white lie British & World English

A harmless or trivial lie, especially one told to avoid hurting someone’s feelings

white oil British & World English

A colourless petroleum distillate, especially liquid paraffin, used medicinally and in the food and plastic industries

white-out British & World English

A dense blizzard, especially in polar regions

White Sea British & World English

An inlet of the Barents Sea on the coast of NW Russia

white tie British & World English

A white bow tie worn by men as part of full evening dress

chalk white British & World English

A shade of white resembling chalk

dead white British & World English

A flat, lustreless white

flake white British & World English

A pure white pigment made from flakes of white lead

flat white British & World English

A type of coffee made with espresso and hot steamed milk, but without the froth characteristic of a cappuccino

milk-white British & World English

Of the opaque white colour of milk

milky-white British & World English

Of the opaque white colour of milk

lily-white British & World English

Pure or ideally white

poor white British & World English

A member of an impoverished white underclass, especially one living in the southern US

snow-white British & World English

Of a pure white colour

White Army British & World English

Any of the armies which opposed the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War of 1918–21

white bass British & World English

A North American freshwater bass with dark horizontal stripes

white belt British & World English

A white belt worn by a beginner in judo or karate

white birch British & World English

A birch tree with white bark, especially the paper birch or the European silver birch

white book British & World English

A book of rules, standards, or records, especially an official government report, bound in white

white-bread British & World English

Belonging to or representative of the white middle classes; not progressive, radical, or innovative

white cedar British & World English

A North American tree of the cypress family

white cell British & World English

less technical term for leucocyte.

white coat British & World English

A long white protective garment worn by doctors, hospital attendants, and laboratory workers

white dwarf British & World English

A small very dense star that is typically the size of a planet. A white dwarf is formed when a low-mass star has exhausted all its central nuclear fuel and lost its outer layers as a planetary nebula

white-faced British & World English

Pale from fear, ill health, or tiredness

white fish British & World English

Fish with pale flesh, such as plaice, halibut, cod, and haddock

white flag British & World English

A white flag or cloth used as a symbol of surrender, truce, or a desire to parley

white flour British & World English

Fine wheat flour, typically bleached, from which most of the bran and germ have been removed

White Friar British & World English

A Carmelite monk


Page: 1 2 3 ... 9