Share this entry

Share this page

admit

(-tt-)
Pronunciation: /ədˈmɪt/

Translation of admit in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 1.1 (allow entry) dejar entrar, admitir [formal] eventually, we were admitted into the museum finalmente nos dejaron or nos permitieron entrar en el museo children are not admitted no se admiten niños [formal] admit one entrada individual 1.2 [patient] ingresar, internar (Southern Cone/Cono Sur) (Mexico/México) she was admitted this morning la ingresaron or (in Southern Cone, Mexico also/en Cono Sur, México también) la internaron esta mañana 1.3 [light/air] permitir or dejar entrar
  • 2 2.1 (confess) [crime/mistake/failure] admitir, reconocer* she's not happy, but she won't admit it no es feliz pero no quiere reconocerlo or admitirlo to admit sth to sb confesarle* algo a algnto admit that/-ing I must admit that I hadn't thought of that tengo que admitir or reconocer que no lo había pensado he admitted having lied reconoció or admitió que había mentido 2.2 (acknowledge) [truth/validity] reconocer* 2.3admit of

Phrasal verbs

admit of

verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento
(permit) [formal] [interpretation/explanation] admitir it admits of one interpretation only solo admite una interpretación, solo cabe una interpretación

admit to

verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento
(confess) [error] admitir, reconocer*; [robbery/attack] declararse culpable de I must admit to a weakness for chocolates debo admitir or reconocer que tengo debilidad por los bombonesto admit to -ing she won't admit to loving him no quiere admitir or reconocer que lo quiere

Definition of admit in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day trocha
f
path …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.