Translation of aggravation in Spanish:

aggravation

Pronunciation: /ˌægrəˈveɪʃən/

noun/nombre

  • 1 uncountable/no numerable (of situation, illness) empeoramiento (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • He pitched in an extended spring training game last week with no further aggravation.
    • In addition, 4 individuals had histories consistent with environmental aggravation of preexisting respiratory disease.
    • They also observed an occasional initial aggravation in symptoms with homoeopathy.
  • 2 2.1 u and c (annoyance) [colloquial/familiar] fastidio (masculine), follón (masculine) (Spain/España) [colloquial/familiar] 2.2 uncountable/no numerable (fighting) (British English/inglés británico) [slang/argot], bronca (feminine) they're trying to start some aggravation están buscando camorra or bronca [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • I didn't have the nerve to confront them, fearing further aggravation.
    • When I first started clubbing I used to dread the brawls and aggravation.
    • Let's get together and have a competition with all the best pilots without the aggravation found at the Worlds.
    More example sentences
    • The boilerplate license agreements have been an additional source of aggravation.
    • For their sakes I shall have to suffer the aggravations of travelling alone.
    • Perhaps I need to find a private moment of zen each day, a way to let the aggravation fly away from here.

Definition of aggravation in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.