Translation of always in Spanish:

always

Pronunciation: /ˈɔːlweɪz/

adv

  • 1.1 (at all times, invariably) siempre you're late as always llegas tarde, como siempre they almost o nearly always win casi siempre ganan the method doesn't always work el método no siempre funciona we're going to Italy, always supposing we have enough money vamos a ir a Italia, siempre y cuando nos alcance el dinero he's always shouting/bossing people around siempre está gritando/dando órdenes, es un gritón/mandón I'm always banging my head on that beam siempre me doy con la cabeza contra esa viga
    More example sentences
    • This annual dinner for the committee and their friends is always an enjoyable occasion.
    • Over the years it seemed to become a household name and the event is always an occasion to look forward to.
    • This is always a lovely community occasion and a large attendance is anticipated.
    More example sentences
    • Then there was the obligatory annoying kid that you always get in these movies.
    • I suppose some would call it a woman's book which always sounds a bit derogatory to me.
    • I loved Halloween but the costume selection part of it was always the most annoying.
    1.2 (alternatively) siempre, en todo caso we can always come back tomorrow siempre or en todo caso podemos volver mañana you could always wear your black dress siempre or en último caso podrías ponerte el vestido negro
    More example sentences
    • As a last resort you could always throw out the computer, but could you survive without eBay?
    • Failing this there is always the marvellous views of the French Alps to look forward to.
    • I think separation seems a bit more straightforward than a divorce and we can always get one at a later stage.

Definition of always in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Catalán is the language of Catalonia. Like Castilian, Catalan is a Romance language. Variants of it include mallorquín of the Balearic Islands and valenciano spoken in the autonomous region of Valencia. Banned under Franco, Catalan has enjoyed a revival since Spain's return to democracy and now has around 11 million speakers. It is the medium of instruction in schools and universities and its use is widespread in business, the arts, and the media. Many books are published in Catalan. See also lenguas cooficiales.