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amplitude

Pronunciation: /ˈæmplətuːd; ˈæmplɪtjuːd/

Translation of amplitude in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (breadth, magnitude) [formal] amplitud (feminine) 1.2 c and u [Physics/Física] [Radio] amplitud (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Lifetimes and the ratio of initial amplitudes remained constant at all energies.
    • Vibrations and amplitudes are higher, giving heavier densities at a higher speed.
    • It keeps its shape, even at large amplitudes, because the speed of waves in the medium depends on frequency in just the right way.
    Example sentences
    • The correlation between changes in the kinetics of synaptic current and quantal amplitude remains strong for the corrected values as well.
    • Practical researchers are only too aware, however, that the optical output can frequently vary significantly in amplitude and spatial quality from point to point within a crystal.
    • Isochronal tail current amplitudes were normalized to the maximum amplitude obtained from that oocyte and plotted versus test potential.
    Example sentences
    • Past the half-mark, it morphs into a more ambitious and complex construction as the strings are given more scope and amplitude, but as they soon retract to the background, the original airy structure returns.
    • And also, given its magnitude, you know, the amplitude increases greatly with each point on the scale.
    • During these same thirty years or more, Sam has also become a writer of true amplitude: of outrage and forgiveness, of directness and intelligence, of tenderness and generosity.

Definition of amplitude in:

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Word of the day tecito
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Cultural fact of the day

The current Spanish Constitution (Constitución Española) was approved in the Cortes Generales in December 1978. It describes Spain as a parliamentary monarchy, gives sovereign power to the people through universal suffrage, recognizes the plurality of religions, and transfers responsibility for defense from the armed forces to the government. The Constitution was generally well received, except in the Basque Country, whose desire for independence it did not satisfy. It is considered to have facilitated the successful transition from dictatorship to democracy.