Translation of anatomy in Spanish:

anatomy

Pronunciation: /əˈnætəmi/

n (plural -mies)

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (science) anatomía (feminine)
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    • The basic human sciences involved are anatomy, physiology, and psychology.
    • The book is primarily designed for students of forensic anthropology and presumes a background in human anatomy and osteology.
    • No study in the history of physics, chemistry, biology or human anatomy and physiology has determined the concept of chi to be an accurate description of how the body works.
    1.2 countable/numerable (body) [humorous/humorístico] anatomía (feminine) [humorous/humorístico] certain parts of his anatomy ciertas partes de su anatomía
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    • But it has led scientists to believe that some animals with very different anatomies are related - for instance, the kangaroo and the platypus, and the hippo and whale.
    • The meat-happy book's unintentional humor peaks with diagrams of different animals' anatomies.
    • The anatomy of different oaks has implications for barrel making.
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    • Speaking about aches in southern regions of the anatomy, what about Becks's female counterpart, the tennis impostor Anna Kournikova?
    • What other part of the anatomy can I show that is going to top that?
    • Pains in other parts of the anatomy also come to mind whenever I think about him.
    1.3 countable/numerable (analysis) [formal] minucioso análisis (masculine)
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    • Although several books have been produced recently on sectional anatomy, none appear to be intended as detailed, comprehensive anatomies.
    • Webster employs this episode in a final analysis of the anatomy of contemporary New Zealand anthropology and Maori studies.
    • He has picked up the latest version of the anatomy of GAA positions, but I have only room left to deal with the first line of defence this week.

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.