Translation of archive in Spanish:

archive

Pronunciation: /ˈɑːrkaɪv; ˈɑːkaɪv/

noun/nombre

(often plural/frecuentemente plural)
  • 1.1 (records) archivo (masculine) film archive(s) filmoteca (feminine) (before noun/delante del nombre) archive footage imágenes (feminine plural) de archivo
    More example sentences
    • Many public libraries also have local history sections containing archives relating to local musical activities and famous musicians.
    • Shot by pioneering film-makers Mitchell & Kenyon, the discovery of this archive collection will rewrite British film history.
    • Through personal archives and institutions we compiled about 500 diaries and a few thousand postcards and letters.
    More example sentences
    • Optical media is also perfect for storing archives of critical corporate data, such as financials or personnel records.
    • At the same time the PRO will outline its digital archive system which will store electronic government records.
    • Second, many ILE faculty members were interested in building data archives with data sets from many different government agencies.
    1.2 (place) archivo (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Plans for a ‘joined up service’, with libraries, archives, museums and galleries all together under one roof, have been launched by East Riding Council.
    • Col Babbitt and Mrs Zemp were invited to visit Rishworth School and yesterday saw the original Sowerby Parish Registers at the archives in the Central Library.
    • The new gallery, with its associated study room and archives, is a £10m joint venture.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

Definition of archive in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.