Translation of artificial in Spanish:

artificial

Pronunciation: /ˌɑːrtəˈfɪʃəl; ˌɑːtɪˈfɪʃəl/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [cream/flowers/silk] artificial; [leather] sintético artificial leg pierna (feminine) ortopédica
    More example sentences
    • This system uses ambient light rather than an artificial light source.
    • He also makes a point of using liqueur ingredients with natural rather than artificial flavorings.
    • Natural and artificial light is reflected from the polished and honed surfaces of the stone clad interior.
    1.2 (contrived) [situation] artificial; [distinction/objection] rebuscado
    More example sentences
    • He went on to call the situation ‘an artificial crisis,’ caused by an increased demand resulting from all the publicity.
    • Admittedly, it was an artificial situation because the operator knew what the problem was and what sequence of keys was needed to cause the fault.
    • That would be to limit the operation of the provision to artificial situations, for which there is no justification either in principle or in the language used.
    1.3 (insincere, unnatural) [smile] afectado, forzado; [person] falso, afectado; [manner] afectado, poco natural
    More example sentences
    • Straight through her flawless appearance and extraordinary manners I saw an artificial person.
    • It's filled with artificial people, with solemn, fake smiles, empty eyes, and briefcases.
    • Their smiles aren't real, they are artificial, paid for by him.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.