Translation of backtrack in Spanish:

backtrack

Pronunciation: /ˈbæktræk/

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1.1 (retrace one's steps) retroceder
    More example sentences
    • No one can make up their minds what to do, and then when they finally do, they end up backtracking, retracing their steps, and returning to the scene of the previous puzzlement to more or less complete the vacuous cycle.
    • When we graduate from high school most of us don't know where we are going to end up-we make U-turns, take forward steps, backtrack, travel and reinvent ourselves several times along the way.
    • Summer backtracked about two steps and then held open the door for her, revealing what looked to be a large public lounge and restroom, complete with about five stalls and a leather sofa, in a private home.
    1.2 (reverse opinion, plan) dar* marcha atrás
    More example sentences
    • Consumers get incredibly upset when dieticians and researchers backtrack on previous findings, proclaiming that products once deemed healthy are now in question.
    • The election manifesto of her Christian Democratic Union party, due next week, is expected to backtrack on promises to slash state handouts and modernise the country.
    • I wonder if Labour will backtrack on its tax policy and increase the brackets for income tax thresholds after learning of this poll - when your own base support is demanding change then you know you are in trouble.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.