There are 2 translations of bail in Spanish:

bail1

Pronunciation: /beɪl/

n

  • 1 uncountable/no numerable [Law/Derecho] fianza (feminine) he was released on bail fue puesto en libertad bajo fianza to post o stand bail for sb pagar* la fianza de algn to grant/refuse bail to sb concederle/denegarle* la libertad bajo fianza a algn to jump bail huir* estando en libertad bajo fianza
    More example sentences
    • The defendants were released on bail at Cork District Court yesterday for sentencing on February 15.
    • A Kirkwall man was released on bail from Kirkwall Sheriff Court on Tuesday after pleading guilty to assault and breach of the peace.
    • Howley was charged with the first of these alleged offences on Friday - two days after he was released on bail from Kirkwall Sheriff Court for a catalogue of admitted crimes.
    More example sentences
    • His family today confirmed they cannot pay the five million drachma bail money which has been set by the judges presiding over his case.
    • The great grandson of the famed make-up artist was supposed to be wearing an electronic tracking device while free on $1 million bail.
    • If one of the world's most famous entertainers did not show up in one hour, he would be sent to jail, losing $3 million bail.
  • 2 countable/numerable (on typewriter) barra (feminine) pisapapeles

Definition of bail in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of bail in Spanish:

bail2

vt

  • 1.1 [Law/Derecho] poner* en libertad bajo fianza 1.2 [Nautical/Náutica] achicar*
    More example sentences
    • Prisoners being bailed to return to the station will also be dealt with separately from those being kept in custody.
    • He was bailed to appear at Swadlincote Magistrates' Court on 12 th October.
    • We see no necessity for a defendant who is bailed to be expressly warned that, if he absconds, he may be tried in his absence, for that has been the English common law for over a century.

Phrasal verbs

bail out

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 1.1 [Law/Derecho] to bail sb out pagarle* la fianza a algn 1.2 [Nautical/Náutica] [water] achicar* 1.1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 2.1 (rescue) sacar* de apuros, echarle un cable a [colloquial/familiar] to bail sb out (of trouble) sacar* a algn de apuros 2.2 [Finance/Finanzas] [bank] rescatar 1.2verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio [Aviation/Aviación] tirarse en paracaídas he bailed out of the burning plane se tiró en paracaídas del avión en llamas

Definition of bail in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.