There are 3 main translations of bark in Spanish:

Share this entry

bark 1

American English: /bɑrk/
British English: /bɑːk/

noun

  • (of dog, seal)
    to give a bark
    soltar un ladrido
    her/his bark is worse than her/his bite
    perro que ladra no muerde or perro ladrador, poco mordedor
    Example sentences
    • As I tucked into this steaming Bunter-sized platter out on the darkening waters, I swear I heard the seals give a loud bark of disapproval.
    • In general, vocalizations are varied and include: trumpeting, whistles, twitters, honks, barks, grunts, quacks, croaks and growls.
    • As soon as the click of key-in-lock was heard Melanie's sharp barks followed.
    Example sentences
    • The Prince laughed, if the humorless barks of sound could really be called laughter.
    • A small bark of laughter sounded from her lips, and she turned to flash a small smile.
    • The guys all elicited little coughs to hide their barks of laughter especially after they saw the look on Chantal's face.

intransitive verb

  • 1.1
    (dog/seal)
    1.2
    (shout) (American English)
    to bark at somebody
    gritarle a alguien
    the sergeant barked at them furiously
    el sargento les gritó furioso
    Example sentences
    • His boss is a brutish oaf who barks orders and commands with little care for his employee's dignity.
    • Then, Leslie barked some command, and we all started doing ‘side steps’.
    • Unseen in the Vancouver dugout, manager Jack McKeon barked commands into a transmitter.
    Example sentences
    • As the band lets the dueling guitars heat up, Johnson barks like a flea market pitchman, bargaining with wary shoppers for humanism and attention.
    • A"Step right up to the Shootin' Corral fellas, first shot's for free!" he had barked in a greasy rasp at cringing fair-goers who tried to creep by his booth unnoticed,
    • From a colourful assortment of fruits, vegetables, fish and meats to vendors barking about bargains for anybody who will listen.
    Example sentences
    • The dog barked at the cat and made to steal the cat's food.
    • As I walked past, the dogs barked at me, and one lunged at me and bit me on the leg.
    • The dog barked at the girl, baring it's canines threateningly at her.

transitive verb

  • (shout)
    (instructions/question)
    to bark (out) an order
    gritar una orden
    dar una orden a gritos

Definition of bark in:

Share this entry

 

There are 3 main translations of bark in Spanish:

Share this entry

bark 2
American English: /bɑrk/
British English: /bɑːk/

noun

  • uncountable (on tree)
    Example sentences
    • Being leaf eaters, they eat a great deal of leaves, fruits, twigs, and tree bark; they have chambered stomachs.
    • On the outer bark of the tree are brown spots, said to resemble the rust spots of nails.
    • I started to look on the ground around the tree for fallen bark and branches, and what I saw was a veritable goldmine of wood that would be just the thing for the huts.

transitive verb

  • 1 (graze) See examples:to bark one's knuckles
    pelarse or rasparse los nudillos
  • 2 (strip)
    (tree/log)
    Example sentences
    • When the celebrations reached their height, initiates climbed nine-foot trees that were barked and notched to form ladders.
    • The others barked the logs, the sawing was done, and each one of the nine men received two wagon loads of good lumber for his share.
    • We felled trees for posts and beams using an old Royal Chinook two-person falling saw and then barked the logs with large drawknives.

Definition of bark in:

Share this entry

 

There are 3 main translations of bark in Spanish:

Share this entry

bark 3
American English: /bɑrk/
British English: /bɑːk/

noun

  • (especially American English) barque

Definition of bark in:

Share this entry

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

QUIZ


    Next Score:
    Word of the day whippersnapper
    Pronunciation: ˈwɪpəsnapə
    noun
    a young, inexperienced person considered presumptuous or overconfident...
    Cultural fact of the day

    ESO (Educación Secundaria Obligatoria) is one of the stages of secondary education established in Spain by the LOE - Ley Orgánica de Educación (2006). It begins at twelve years of age and ends at sixteen, the age at which compulsory education ends. The old division between a technical and an academic education is not as marked in ESO, as all secondary pupils receive basic professional training.