There are 2 main translations of barrack in Spanish:

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barrack 1

Pronunciation: / ˈbærək /American English: /ˈbɛrək/
British English: /ˈbarək/

transitive verb

  • (house)
    (soldiers)
    alojar en barracones
    Example sentences
    • The authorities in a small Czech town put on a dance so that the soldiers barracked there can mingle with the local girls.
    • When not at war, the Macedonian army was barracked at state expense and underwent sophisticated training while in quarters.
    • Still, there were over a dozen of them barracked in the new guardhouse at the gate to the estate.

Definition of barrack in:

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There are 2 main translations of barrack in Spanish:

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barrack 2
American English: /ˈbɛrək/
British English: /ˈbarək/

transitive verb

  • (British English) (jeer)
    (speaker/performer)
    Example sentences
    • Despite the fact that Hart was not even at the racecourse, his horse was barracked and jeered in scenes that came within a whisker of descending into violence.
    • During the heated debate, the Mayor Roger Clarke as Chair, struggled to maintain order amid barracking from the public galleries.
    • But if the home support, who took great delight in barracking their Palace counterparts before turning their ire on their own players, expected a rout, they were to be sorely disappointed.

intransitive verb

  • (British English) (jeer)
    (audience/crowd)

Definition of barrack in:

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