There are 2 main translations of beak in Spanish:

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beak 1

Pronunciation: / biːk /American English: /bik/
British English: /biːk/

noun

  • 1 (of bird, animal)
    Example sentences
    • New research suggests that as testosterone in male birds increases, so does the level of carotenoids, the chemicals that create the bright coloring on birds' feathers, beaks, and legs.
    • Whether the flightless birds used their beaks to impale or bludgeon their prey is unknown, Chiappe says.
    • As a trombone player pulls in the slide to make a higher frequency sound by reducing the volume of the tube, so does a bird open its beak and pull back its head to reduce the volume of its vocal tract.

Definition of beak in:

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There are 2 main translations of beak in Spanish:

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beak 2
Pronunciation: / biːk /American English: /bik/
British English: /biːk/

noun

  • (British English) [colloquial] [humorous] (magistrate)
    juez, (jueza) (masculine, feminine)
    Example sentences
    • In order to help out I moved from the fines court to the Magistrates Court next door and went up before the beak, or beakess on this occasion.
    • But the union beaks decreed that because the league regulations were drawn up under English legal guidelines, they had the right to ‘prosecute’ the player under their own procedure.
    • That seems a good point to me, particularly in views of recent court cases where greengrocers were up before the beaks just because they sold fruit and veg in pounds when legislation now rules that goods must be sold in metric units.

Definition of beak in:

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    Cultural fact of the day

    comarca

    In Spain, a geographical, social, and culturally homogeneous region, with a clear natural or administrative demarcation is called a comarca. Comarcas are normally smaller than regiones. They are often famous for some reason, for example Ampurdán (Catalonia) for its wines, or La Mancha (Castile) for its cheeses.