There are 2 translations of belt in Spanish:

belt1

Pronunciation: /belt/

n

  • 1 1.1 [Clothing] cinturón (m) green/brown belt (in judo, karate) cinturón (m) or cinto (m) or (Méx) cinta (f) verde/marrón (person) cinturón (mf) or (Méx) cinta (mf) verde/marrón belt and braces (BrE) he has a belt-and-braces approach le gusta tomar todas las precauciones (del caso) to have sth under one's belt tener* algo a sus ( or mis etc) espaldas, tener* algo en su ( or mi etc) haber with a string of hits under his belt con una serie de hits a sus espaldas or en su haber to hit below the belt dar* un golpe bajo that was a bit below the belt ¡ése fue un golpe bajo! to tighten one's belt apretarse* el cinturón 1.2 (for holding tools) cinturón (m) para herramientas
    (cartridge belt)
    cartuchera (f), canana (f)
    (gun belt)
    cinturón (m) (con pistolera)
  • 3 (area) a belt of rain/low pressure un frente lluvioso/de bajas presiones the industrial belt el cinturón industrial the cotton belt la zona or región algodonera Bible Belt

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of belt in Spanish:

belt2

vt

  • [colloquial/familiar] darle* una paliza a he belted me on the ear (AmE) o (BrE) round the ear me dio un tortazo or (Méx) un trancazo [familiar/colloquial]

vi

  • to belt along/in/off ir*/entrar/salir* zumbando or como un bólido [familiar/colloquial]

Phrasal verbs

belt down

v + o + adv, v + adv + o (AmE)
[colloquial/familiar] to belt one down tomarse una he's over there belting them down ahí está, tomándose una tras otra or [familiar/colloquial] empinando el codo

belt out

v + o + adv, v + adv + o
[colloquial/familiar] (sing) cantar a grito pelado [familiar/colloquial]; (play) tocar* muy fuerte

belt up

v + adv (BrE) [colloquial/familiar]
1.1 (be quiet) callarse la boca, cerrar* el pico [familiar/colloquial] 1.2 [Auto] ponerse* el cinturón

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Definition of belt in:

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.