Translation of blackout in Spanish:

blackout

Pronunciation: /ˈblækaʊt/

n

  • 1 1.1 (loss of consciousness) desvanecimiento (m), desmayo (m) to have a blackout tener* or sufrir un desvanecimiento 1.2 (failure of memory) pérdida (f) temporal de la memoria, laguna (f)
    More example sentences
    • Pacemakers are usually used to treat an abnormally slow heartbeat which can cause dizziness, fainting or blackouts.
    • Some known dissociative states induced by substance abuse include alcoholic blackouts and substance-induced amnestic disorder.
    • The vast majority of what is known about alcohol-induced blackouts is derived from research with hospitalized alcoholics.
  • 2 (in wartime)oscurecimiento de la ciudad para que esta no sea visible desde los aviones enemigos
  • 3 3.1 (power failure) apagón (m) 3.2 [Rad] [TV] suspensión (f) en la emisión
    More example sentences
    • The government has imposed a censorship blackout on the media and no journalists are permitted in the war zone.
    • They had imposed a strict blackout on media coverage of the coffins returning to Dover, claiming that it is was meant to protect the privacy of the slain soldiers' families.
    • Because the government and the media have imposed a blackout on the protest, it is not known how many are still refusing food and water.
    3.3 (embargo) a news blackout un bloqueo informativo

Definition of blackout in:

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