There are 3 translations of blast in Spanish:

blast1

Pronunciation: /blæst; blɑːst/

n

  • 1 (of air, wind) ráfaga (f); (of water, sand) chorro (m) an icy blast una ráfaga de aire helado
    More example sentences
    • When I stepped out of the car, I was hit with a blast of icy wind.
    • The wind delivered consistent blasts in between gusts and gales.
    • For once the weather bureau got it right and the predicted cold front arrived last night with a blast of icy wind.
  • 2 2.1 (explosion) [journalese/lenguaje periodístico] explosión (feminine) 2.2 (explosive charge) carga (feminine) 2.3 (shock wave) onda (feminine) expansiva she caught the full blast of his rage recibió todo el impacto de su furia
    More example sentences
    • The plane shuddered with shock waves from the blast.
    • The shock wave from the blast kills the majority of fish species on the reef and causes severe damage to its structure.
    • The blast caused a shock wave across the town, smashing windows and shaking houses.
    2.4 (outburst) embestida (f), ataque (m) he got a real blast from his wife [colloquial/familiar] su mujer le echó una buena bronca [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • He swung the gun around, firing two sharp blasts at the other man.
    • The shotgun blast was followed by a sharp percussive explosion as the entire hillside lit up in a white phosphorescent glare.
    • The first man arrested by the police in connection with the latest bomb blasts turned out to have no connection with the suicide bombers.
    More example sentences
    • She gives the leftie columnist a big blast for the dishonesty of his criticisms.
    • So it is no mystery why my blast at the historian did not get the attention his did.
    • Another blast of criticism was aimed at the good lady wife of the rock musician.
  • 3 (of sound) toque (masculine) (at) full blast he had the TV on full blast tenía la tele a todo volumen or [colloquial/familiar] a todo lo que daba the printer was going (at) full blast la empresora estaba trabajando a toda máquina or a todo trapo
    More example sentences
    • The phrases noted above are like blasts from an air horn or plastic trumpet, blaring technical correctness.
    • He was awakened in the morning by a loud blast from an oxen horn.
    • I was about to sob and lament to myself when I heard the loud blast of a horn.
  • 4 (enjoyable event) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar] the party turned into a real blast la fiesta se desmadró [colloquial/familiar] it'll be a blast será el desmadre [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of blast in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

The deck of cards used in Spain is called the baraja francesa. The four suits are oros, copas, espadas, and bastos, corresponding to diamonds, hearts, spades, and clubs. Each suit has nine numbered cards and three face cards - jack (sota), knight, and king. There is no queen.

There are 3 translations of blast in Spanish:

blast2

vt

  • 1 1.1 (blow) [dam/rock] volar* they used dynamite to blast the safe open usaron dinamita para volar or hacer saltar la caja fuerte it would blast your foot off te arrancaría el pie the explosion blasted a gaping hole in the wall la explosión abrió un boquete enorme en la pared
    More example sentences
    • Every piece of the hard rock had to be blasted out before being broken up with pick and shovel.
    • Trees were broken and cracked open, and buildings had been blasted apart as if by dynamite.
    • A van filled with homemade explosives blasts the federal building in the city.
    1.2 (shoot) [journalese/lenguaje periodístico] acribillar 1.3 (attack) [journalese/lenguaje periodístico] atacar*, arremeter contra
    More example sentences
    • She has blasted the senator's criticism of the war by reminding viewers that he voted for the war.
    • Critics blasted him for pouring taxpayer funds into badly managed banks and unneeded infrastructure projects.
    • It was also a colossal failure, shunned by audiences and blasted by critics as ‘pretentious.’
  • 2 (expressing annoyance) (especially British English/especialmente inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] blast it! ¡maldición! [colloquial/familiar] blast him! he's forgotten to leave the keys ¡maldito sea! se olvidó de dejar las llaves [colloquial/familiar] blast the exam! I'm not doing any more revision ¡al diablo con el examen! no pienso repasar más
  • 3 (ruin) [literary/literario] [crops] malograr championship hopes blasted by injury [journalese/lenguaje periodístico] una lesión echa por tierra or malogra las esperanzas de ganar el campeonato

Phrasal verbs

blast away

verb + adverb + object, verb + object + adverb/verbo + adverbio + complemento, verbo + complemento + adverbio [rock/dam] volar* 1.1verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio to blast away at sth seguir* disparando contra algo

blast off

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
[rocket/astronaut] despegar*

blast out

verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento
[message] emitir a todo volumen; [music] tocar* a todo volumen or [colloquial/familiar] a todo lo que da

Definition of blast in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

The deck of cards used in Spain is called the baraja francesa. The four suits are oros, copas, espadas, and bastos, corresponding to diamonds, hearts, spades, and clubs. Each suit has nine numbered cards and three face cards - jack (sota), knight, and king. There is no queen.

There are 3 translations of blast in Spanish:

blast3

exclamation

  • (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], ¡maldición! [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of blast in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

The deck of cards used in Spain is called the baraja francesa. The four suits are oros, copas, espadas, and bastos, corresponding to diamonds, hearts, spades, and clubs. Each suit has nine numbered cards and three face cards - jack (sota), knight, and king. There is no queen.