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blazon

Pronunciation: /ˈbleɪzn/

Translation of blazon in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

[literary/literario]
  • 1to blazon sth forth o abroad pregonar algo a voz en cuello
    Example sentences
    • Predictably, the New York Times has enhanced these efforts by blazoning them on Page One.
    • Editors who blazon every rumour on their front pages, politicians who hold weekly press conferences on ‘international threat levels’ and policemen who boast their tally of menaces averted are the arms salesmen of terror.
    • Newspapers still blazoned headlines on the catastrophe, and articles described the bombing as the work of one man.
  • 2 (decorate) (usually passive/normalmente en voz pasiva) to be blazoned with sth estar* bordado or recamado de algo [literary/literario]
    Example sentences
    • At Fonthill the crest and the thirty-six quarterings of Beckford's full coat-of-arms were blazoned on the carpets and painted glass windows.
    • He touched the entwined dragons that were blazoned onto his skin.
    • Why would an occasional fisherman say this of a boat that a well-meaning NGO - its name blazoned on the side of the boat - gave him a few months ago?

Definition of blazon in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.