Translation of blowout in Spanish:

blowout

Pronunciation: /ˈbləʊaʊt/

n

  • 1.1 (feast) [colloquial/familiar] comilona (f) [familiar/colloquial], fiestón (m) [familiar/colloquial] 1.2 (burst tire) reventón (m) we had a blowout se nos reventó un neumático
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    • You never know when you are going to suffer a tyre blowout or when another driver is just going to be plain careless.
    • Tyre blowouts are common on a lot of trips and this is an area that weight can have a huge effect on.
    • Most roads are gravel, meaning accidents and tyre blowouts are not uncommon.
    1.3 (of fuse) there has been a blowout han saltado or se han fundido or se han quemado los fusibles 1.4 (AmE) [Sport] paliza (f) [familiar/colloquial], derrota (f) aplastante
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    • He was still crowing over the success of his Dallas showroom expansion and the blowout coming-out party.
    • But before we can weigh anchor, Flores erupts into Festa do Emigrante, a blowout party celebrating Azorean emigrants' annual return to the islands, beginning in July.
    • Despite the minor grumbles, we had a superb meal - especially with palates so jaded after the festive blowout.
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    • Only the Vikings broke the barrier in a blowout victory over the Packers.
    • Gus was tenacious defensively; even in a blowout victory he wouldn't let the other team have an inch of space.
    • While the first two games were both blowouts, the first playoff game in Memphis' history was highly competitive with the Spurs never leading by more than 6 points.
    1.5 (AmE) (argument) disputa (f); (outburst) arrebato (m)
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    • I had a big blowout with the federal government.
    • If you can't talk about this without a big blowout, write her a letter explaining how you feel.
    • Letting frustrations fester is a real good way to ensure blowouts and fits of anger later on, so best to get it all out in the open.

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