Translation of blues in Spanish:

blues

Pronunciation: /bluːz/

plural noun/nombre plural

  • 1 (depression) [colloquial/familiar] the blues la depre [colloquial/familiar] to have the blues estar* con la depre [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • You say you've got the blues in your alligator shoes.
    • Your bud's got the blues: you have a bud who's just not herself lately?
    • He was basically a rich kid coming up, but he got the blues down deep in his own way.
  • 2 [Music/Música] blues (masculine) to play/sing (the) blues tocar*/cantar blues
    More example sentences
    • People never know if my music is jazz or blues or folk or pop, but I don't know how to put myself into a category.
    • What emerges from this mixture is a very American sound that mixes jazz, country and western, rock, popular song, folk, and the blues.
    • That progressed from the blues into folk and gospel music and things like that.
    More example sentences
    • Each book contains ballads, blues, Latin pieces and rags.
    • I'm going to do a Blues and then I get into a Ballad and then...?
    • ‘I love her because she would sing all over the song, rather than just do it straight, and she could sing a standard in a gritty gospel style then do a blues and just kill everyone in the room.’

Definition of blues in:

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a ración is a serving of food eaten in a bar or cafe, generally with a drink. Friends or relatives meet in a bar or cafe, order a number of raciones, and share them. Raciones tend to be larger and more elaborate than tapas. They may be: Spanish omelet, squid, octopus, cheese, ham, or chorizo, among others.