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blues

Pronunciation: /bluːz/

Translation of blues in Spanish:

plural noun/nombre plural

  • 1 (depression) [colloquial/familiar] the blues la depre [colloquial/familiar] to have the blues estar* con la depre [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • You say you've got the blues in your alligator shoes.
    • Your bud's got the blues: you have a bud who's just not herself lately?
    • He was basically a rich kid coming up, but he got the blues down deep in his own way.
  • 2 [Music/Música] blues (masculine) to play/sing (the) blues tocar*/cantar blues
    Example sentences
    • People never know if my music is jazz or blues or folk or pop, but I don't know how to put myself into a category.
    • What emerges from this mixture is a very American sound that mixes jazz, country and western, rock, popular song, folk, and the blues.
    • That progressed from the blues into folk and gospel music and things like that.
    Example sentences
    • Each book contains ballads, blues, Latin pieces and rags.
    • I'm going to do a Blues and then I get into a Ballad and then...?
    • ‘I love her because she would sing all over the song, rather than just do it straight, and she could sing a standard in a gritty gospel style then do a blues and just kill everyone in the room.’

Definition of blues in:

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Word of the day trocha
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.