There are 3 translations of bluff in Spanish:

bluff1

Pronunciation: /blʌf/

vi

vt

  • she's bluffing us nos quiere engañar, se está marcando un farol (Esp) [familiar/colloquial], nos está metiendo la mula (CS) [familiar/colloquial] they were bluffed into believing that the diamonds were there les hicieron creer que los diamantes estaban allí he managed to bluff his way out of it o to bluff it out logró salir del apuro embaucándolos
    More example sentences
    • However, it is entirely legal to try to mislead the opponents about your intentions by bluffing in the bidding, naming a contract completely different from the one you really want to play.
    • Both their livelihoods depend on the ability to bluff and sniff out fraud.
    • Now it seems he may have been bluffing all along, thus the efficacy of such a coalition seems doubtful.

Definition of bluff in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 3 translations of bluff in Spanish:

bluff2

n

  • 1 u c (pretense) bluff (m), blof (m) (Col, Méx) to call sb's bluff poner* a algn en evidencia
    More example sentences
    • This over-reaction is of course a bluff, an attempt to silence opposition, almost suggesting that these practices, reprehensible to me, are necessary for secular democracy.
    • His denunciation of my research is an audacious bluff, believable only by those who have never opened my book.
    • She glanced off the platform and then back at him, hoping that he would believe her bluff and cough up the money.
  • 2 c (cliff) risco (m), acantilado (m)
    More example sentences
    • Planning the campaign involved myriad geographical factors, including the Mississippi Delta region, streams of various navigabilities, steep banks, and bluffs northeast of the city.
    • The East Coast consists of several narrow bands of lowlands that lead to an intermediate zone of steep bluffs and ravines abutting a 1650 foot escarpment which provides access to the central highlands.
    • The Marin Headlands, the dramatic bluffs and canyons just north of the Golden Gate Bridge, are a perspective-altering place.

Definition of bluff in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 3 translations of bluff in Spanish:

bluff3

adj (-er, -est)

  • [person] francote [familiar/colloquial], campechano
    More example sentences
    • Matching his rugged features he cultivated a bluff manner, parading humble origins and ridiculing a man who corrected his accent.
    • He flattered his clients on their excellent judgment in buying from him rather than his competitors, but he could be bluff and straightforward when necessary.
    • HE'S the gruff, bluff detective who's as likely to bawl you out for making bad tea as to snap the handcuffs on a villain - so would you let him loose in a fighter jet?

Definition of bluff in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.