There are 2 translations of blush in Spanish:

blush1

Pronunciation: /blʌʃ/

vi

  • ruborizarse*, ponerse* colorado or rojo, sonrojarse I blush easily me ruborizo por nada, me pongo colorado or rojo por nada he blushed scarlet at her words se puso como la grana or [familiar/colloquial] como un tomate con lo que dijo she blushed with shame se puso colorada de vergüenza I blush to admit that … [humorístico/humorous] me avergüenza tener que reconocer que …

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of blush in Spanish:

blush2

n

  • 1.1 (in cheeks) (often pl) rubor (m) to spare sb's blushes she spared his blushes and didn't mention his behavior the previous night le ahorró un bochorno al no mencionar su comportamiento de la noche anterior oh, spare my blushes! no me hagas pasar vergüenza, no hagas que me ruborice 1.2 (in sky, flower) tono (m) rosáceo

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.