Translation of bog in Spanish:

bog

Pronunciation: /bɔːg; bɑːg; bɒg/

n

  • 1 countable or uncountable/numerable o no numerable 1.1 (swamp) ciénaga (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Soggy areas called peat bogs have developed in parts of the country.
    • Help to open up an area of peat bog by cutting and burning small trees at Cumbria Wildlife Trust's Foulshaw Moss, near Witherslack, on Saturday.
    • The bog road was too soft for his heavy horse and cart to traverse, so he had to condescend to ask his two neighbours to put out and take home the turf with their donkeys and creels.
    1.2
    (peat bog)
    tremedal (masculine)
  • 2 countable/numerable (lavatory) (British English/inglés británico) [slang/argot], retrete (m), cagadero (m) [vulgar]

Phrasal verbs

bog down

(-gg- verb + object + adverb/verbo + complemento + adverbio (usually passive/normalmente en voz pasiva))
to get bogged down [vehicle] quedar empantanado I'm terribly bogged down with work estoy inundado de trabajo don't get bogged down in too much detail no te enredes con demasiados detalles the discussion was getting bogged down in trivialities la discusión se estaba empantanando en detalles nimios

Definition of bog in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's War of Independence against Napoleon Bonaparte's French occupation was ignited by the popular revolt in Madrid on 2 May 1808 against the French army. With support from the Duke of Wellington, Spanish resistance continued for over five years in a guerra de guerrillas which gave the world the concept and the term guerrilla warfare. The autocratic Fernando VII was restored to the throne in 1814, and his first act was to abolish the progressive Constitution of Cadiz adopted in 1812.