There are 2 translations of boil in Spanish:

boil1

Pronunciation: /bɔɪl/

n

  • 1 [Med] furúnculo (m), forúnculo (m)
    More example sentences
    • You can use them to treat sores, bruises, cuts, boils and inflammatory skin conditions.
    • Symptoms of diabetes include having to get up at night to go to the toilet, feeling thirsty, lacking energy and getting reoccurring infections such as boils and abscesses.
    • It is useful for boils and skin ulcerations, like bedsores and canker sores.
  • 2 (boiling point) on the boil the vegetables are on the boil las verduras se están haciendo to keep the kettle on the boil mantener* el agua hirviendo he has another project on the boil tiene otro proyecto entre manos to bring sth to the boil bring the water back to the boil dejar que el agua vuelva a romper el hervor or [formal] vuelva a alcanzar el punto de ebullición they have brought the issue back to the boil han vuelto a poner el tema sobre el tapete to go off the boil don't let the pot go off the boil que el agua ( or la sopa etc) no deje de hervir interest in the affair has gone off the boil ha decaído el interés en el asunto
    More example sentences
    • Cover with a lid, bring to a boil, and simmer for fifteen minutes.
    • Bring to a boil and slowly whisk in the cornstarch, a little at a time.
    • Combine the milk, butter and vanilla in a medium saucepan, and bring to a boil.

Definition of boil in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of boil in Spanish:

boil2

vi

  • 1.1 (be at boiling point) [water/meat/vegetables] hervir* the kettle's boiling! ¡hierve el agua! add boiling water añada agua hirviendo the rice has boiled dry el arroz se ha quedado sin agua 1.2 (seethe) [literario/literary] [sea] bullir* [literario/literary]
    More example sentences
    • Outside, the wind was blowing and dark storm clouds were boiling.
    • Clouds boiled in the sky overhead, blocking out the sun and heralding a storm.
    • I stood on the front porch watching horizontal sheets of rain sweep up the driveway as the clouds boiled menacingly overhead.
    1.3 (be excited) he was boiling with rage le hervía la sangre de rabia

vt

  • 1 1.1 (bring to boiling point) [water/milk] hervir*, llevar a punto de ebullición [formal] 1.2 (keep at boiling point) [soup/sauce] hervir*, dejar hervir 1.3 (cook in boiling water) [vegetables/beef] cocer*, hervir* boil the eggs for three minutes cocer or hervir los huevos tres minutos
    More example sentences
    • Instead, they found it was healthier to boil food in water or a light stock.
    • In addition, wherever eggs have been boiled for the recipes above, then they need to be peeled before moving on to the next stage of the recipe.
    • British travellers can fall victim to the disease if they do not boil food and water before consumption.
    1.4 (wash at boiling point) [cotton/linen] hervir*
    More example sentences
    • The first surgical gloves were boiled to achieve sterilization.
    • You can also sterilise equipment by boiling it in water for at least 10 minutes.
    • If you are not satisfied that this washing powder boils your clothes whiter than any other washing product return the unused portion of the first packet you buy to us and we will send you double its purchase price.
    More example sentences
    • I had to boil up the water in an old kettle with a frayed wire.
    • Water was boiled in kettles, saucepans and other containers on the top of the stove, and baking done in the oven.
    • The first paddle steamers typically used oil-fired boilers, which provided heat to boil water, which generated steam to power the boat.
    More example sentences
    • When the kettle had been boiled and the tea had been made we all went up to Terri's bedroom.
    • She came to the rescue by boiling up seven kettles of water on her range and arranged for them to be delivered to the school.
    • This means having to boil up saucepans of water to have a bath.
  • 2
    (boiled past p)
    [potatoes/rice/cabbage] hervido; [ham] cocido [egg] (soft) pasado por agua; (hard) duro boiled sweet (BrE) caramelo (m) de fruta

Phrasal verbs

boil away

v + adv (evaporate) [sauce/water] consumirse, evaporarse 1.1v + o + adv, v + adv + o (cause to evaporate) evaporar

boil down

v + o + adv, v + adv + o
(reduce) [stock/sauce] reducir*

boil down to

v + adv + prep + o

boil off

boil away 2

boil over

v + adv
1.1 [milk] irse* por el fuego, salirse*, subirse (Chi) ; [pan] desbordarse 1.2 [person] perder* el control the demonstration boiled over into a riot la manifestación terminó en una revuelta

boil up

v + adv
[colloquial/familiar] estarse* preparando

Definition of boil in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.