There are 2 translations of bomb in Spanish:

bomb1

Pronunciation: /bɑːm; bɒm/

n

  • 1 [Military/Militar] 1.1 (explosive device) bomba (feminine) the room looked as if a bomb had hit it [colloquial/familiar] la habitación estaba toda patas arriba [colloquial/familiar] to go down a bomb (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] hacer* furor [colloquial/familiar] to go like a bomb (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] [car/motorbike] ir* como un bólido [colloquial/familiar] (be successful) the party went like a bomb la fiesta fue un exitazo [colloquial/familiar] the business is going like a bomb el negocio marcha a las mil maravillas to put a bomb under sb [colloquial/familiar] darle* una sacudida a algn (before noun/delante del nombre) bomb scare amenaza (feminine) de bomba bomb squad [colloquial/familiar] brigada (feminine) antiexplosivos or de explosivos
    More example sentences
    • The second night attack, which used high explosive and incendiary bombs alternately, caused the first man-made firestorm which affected an area of 22sq.km.
    • According to sources, dissident groups are now at work planning to plant bombs or detonate incendiary devices.
    • An exact mix of high explosive and incendiary bombs was used to start the kind of fires that burned Dresden.
    More example sentences
    • He made sure of that when he sent her a package bomb that blew off her hands and nearly killed her.
    • The building has been targeted before, and was the scene of a massive van bomb in 1993.
    • Recent attempted van bomb attacks were foiled in Derry and Belfast.
    1.2 (atomic or nuclear) the bomb la bomba (atómica)
  • 2 (flop) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], desastre (masculine) [colloquial/familiar], fracaso (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • LCD televisions are all the rage, but a space-saving panel with a picture to rival your traditional set will cost a bomb.
    • They may be high fashion, and they may well cost a bomb, but they are, fundamentally, half your basic shell suit.
    • The show didn't cost a bomb and was in aid of a local charity for children.
    More example sentences
    • And while expensive star signings have won lacklustre ratings, the channel's film arm has produced a string of critical and commercial bombs.
    More example sentences
    • But as it turns out, this cute little game is still da bomb.
    • I played using more of the lower register, which is totally DA BOMB on my violin, and I really need to do that more often.
    • He is simply ‘da Bomb’ where ladies are concerned.

Definition of bomb in:

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Word of the day tuna
f
prickly pear …
Cultural fact of the day

Did you know that bable (or asturiano) is a variety of Castilian spoken in Asturias? It went into decline when the kingdom of Castile achieved political dominance and imposed Castilian on what became Spain. By the twentieth century it was confined to rural areas. With the revival of Spanish regional languages

There are 2 translations of bomb in Spanish:

bomb2

vt

  • 1 1.1 (from air) [city/factory] bombardear
    More example sentences
    • In advance of the line of attack the Luftwaffe heavily bombed all road and rail junctions, and concentrations of Polish troops.
    • The next occasion Bangkok heard the drone of Allied bombers was 19 December when the dock area was bombed at night.
    • We strafed and bombed the city until 23,000 of them were dead.
    1.2 (plant bomb in) [hotel/shop/train] colocar* una bomba en
  • 2 (condemn) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], poner* por los suelos [colloquial/familiar]

vi

[colloquial/familiar]
  • 1.1 (flop) [play/novel] ser* un fracaso, estrellarse [colloquial/familiar], tronar* (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar], jalar (Peru/Perú) [colloquial/familiar] I bombed in physics me reprobaron or (Spain/España) me suspendieron en física, me catearon (Spain/España) or (Mexico/México) me tronaron or (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) me bocharon or (Chile) me rajaron or (Peru/Perú) me jalaron en física [colloquial/familiar] 1.2 (go fast) (British English/inglés británico) ir* a toda mecha [colloquial/familiar], ir* a todo lo que da [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • I have heard many a screeching of car breaks as the driver has been bombing along and come around the corner to meet a huge tractor.
    • Kevin Alderton is hoping to set the first-ever blind speed skiing record by bombing down a snowy slope at more than 100 mph.
    • It is the concern of the bank that prices have bombed along despite expectations to the contrary, he said.
    More example sentences
    • His first film bombed because it failed to live up to its name.
    • The hugely expensive film bombed so badly that one of Hollywood's most venerable companies, United Artists, was destroyed.
    • The distributors were not going to be happy, said the theatre manager, although since the film had bombed in Auckland they were probably not expecting too much.

Definition of bomb in:

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Word of the day tuna
f
prickly pear …
Cultural fact of the day

Did you know that bable (or asturiano) is a variety of Castilian spoken in Asturias? It went into decline when the kingdom of Castile achieved political dominance and imposed Castilian on what became Spain. By the twentieth century it was confined to rural areas. With the revival of Spanish regional languages