There are 2 translations of boost in Spanish:

boost1

Pronunciation: /buːst/

n

  • 1.1 c (uplift) the results are a boost to her campaign los resultados son un incentivo or un espaldarazo para su campaña it was a tremendous boost to her confidence le dio mucha más confianza en sí misma to give a boost to sth dar* empuje a algo, estimular algo the theater is to receive a $250,000 boost in subsidies el teatro recibirá una inyección de 250.000 dólares en ayudas oficiales 1.2 c (lift, leg-up) (no pl) he gave me a boost over the wall/up onto the roof me dio impulso para saltar la tapia/para subir al tejado

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of boost in Spanish:

boost2

vt

  • [economy/production] estimular; [trade] estimular, fomentar, potenciar; [sales] aumentar, incrementar; [morale] levantar [pressure/signal] [Elec] elevar to boost sb's confidence darle* más confianza en sí mismo a algn she boosts her diet with vitamin pills complementa su dieta con vitaminas the TV show has boosted its audience el número de telespectadores del programa ha aumentado

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.