Translation of bottle in Spanish:

bottle

Pronunciation: /ˈbɑːtl; ˈbɒtl/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 countable/numerable (container) botella (feminine); (of perfume, medicine, ink) frasco (masculine) return empty bottles devuelva los envases or (in Spain also/en España también) los cascos a wine/milk bottle una botella de vino/leche ([ el envase ]) a bottle of wine/milk una botella de vino/leche baby's o feeding bottle biberón (masculine), mamadera (feminine) (Southern Cone/Cono Sur) (Peru/Perú) , tetero (masculine) (Colombia) , mamila (feminine) (Mexico/México) we must get together over a bottle tenemos que reunirnos para tomar algo bottle rack botellero (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Do not store poisons in drink bottles, glasses, or jars.
    • Fans inside the Arena had started pelting each other with plastic beer glasses and bottles, and the concert was temporarily halted.
    • She did as she was told and trotted off into the kitchen and she looked around for a glass bottle containing a colorless liquid.
    1.2 countable/numerable (contents) botella (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • For example, the alcoholic content of a bottle of wine must be indicated and also its origin and where the wine was bottled.
    • You can check this by sampling a bottle of Bollinger's Vieilles Vignes (ungrafted old vines) against a bottle made from their grafted vines.
    • It being the longest day of the year, I suppose I should have been celebrating some arcane shamanic ritual, but I just put my foot up and finished the remains of a bottle of schnapps.
    1.3 (alcohol) [colloquial/familiar] to go on the bottle darse* a la bebida to come off the bottle dejar la bebida to hit the bottle darle* a la bebida or (especially Latin America/especialmente América Latina) al trago [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • As a result, the villagers turn to the bottle, drinking to forget how dreary their lives are.
    • Reading the Government's plans to liberalise the licensing laws could be enough to make anybody turn to the bottle.
    • The minimum age of boys taking to the bottle in The State has fallen to as low as 13.5 years.
    More example sentences
    • But these figures do seem to seriously undermine the slur that the Spaniards lost their bottle after the bombs.
    • So he lost his bottle in the end, and postponed the general election before he had even called it.
    • We started slowly, but we wore them down and they lost their bottle when we were 8-3 up.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (courage, nerve) (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], agallas (feminine plural) [colloquial/familiar] to have a lot of bottle tener* muchas agallas [colloquial/familiar], ser* muy agalludo (Latin America/América Latina) [colloquial/familiar] to lose one's bottle achicarse* [colloquial/familiar], acobardarse

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 1.1 [wine/beer/milk] embotellar bottled in France embotellado en Francia bottled beer/milk cerveza (feminine)/leche (feminine) en or de botella bottled water agua (feminine (with masculine article in the singular)) embotellada 1.2 (British English/inglés británico) [Cookery/Cocina] poner* en conserva
  • 2 (hit with bottle) (British English/inglés británico) [slang/argot], darle* un botellazo a

Phrasal verbs

bottle out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (British English/inglés británico)
[slang/argot] rajarse [colloquial/familiar], acobardarse

bottle up

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento
[colloquial/familiar] [emotion/frustration/hate] reprimir don't bottle it all up inside you no te lo guardes dentro

Definition of bottle in:

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Word of the day bártulos
mpl
gear …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, pinchos are small portions of food, often on a cocktail stick, eaten in a bar or cafe. Often free, they are similar to tapas, but much smaller. There are pinchos of many foods, including Spanish omelet, ham, sausage, and anchovy.