There are 2 translations of brake in Spanish:

brake1

Pronunciation: /breɪk/

n

  • 1.1 (on vehicle) freno (m) to apply the brakes frenar drum/disc/hydraulic brakes frenos de tambor/de disco/hidráulicos the back/front brakes los frenos delanteros/traseros to put the brakes o a brake on sth [colloquial/familiar] poner* freno a algo (before n) brake blocks pastillas (fpl) del freno brake fluid líquido (m) de frenos brake lights luces (fpl) de freno or de frenado brake lining forro (m) or guarnición (f) del freno brake pedal pedal (m) del freno brake shoe zapata (f) del freno
    More example sentences
    • And it uses the same technology as ESP by applying engine and brake control to the vehicle.
    • Yes, the gearbox was a bit saggy and I was alarmed at how much pressure the brake pedal needed to do an emergency stop, but other than this, all was well.
    • Pressing the DSC switch briefly disables the engine intervention, and uses the wheel brakes to control wheel spin.
    1.2
    (handbrake)
    freno (m) de mano to put on o apply the brake poner* el freno de mano

Definition of brake in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of brake in Spanish:

brake2

Definition of brake in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.