There are 2 translations of brittle in Spanish:

brittle1

Pronunciation: /ˈbrɪtl/

adj

  • 1.1 (fragile) [twigs/bones] quebradizo; [agreement/peace] frágil, precario
    More example sentences
    • Quartz is a very hard stone; it's also brittle and breaks easily into small chunks.
    • The Earth's crust, as with many planetary crusts, is brittle and breaks relatively easily.
    • In severe cases, nails may become brittle and break easily.
    1.2 (tense) [laugh/reply/voice] crispado
    More example sentences
    • O'Toole's clear blue eyes and brittle voice flood with so much anguish and pain that even Pitt's fixed pout and the awful lines cannot make a laughable travesty of the scene.
    • When he spoke again, his voice was brittle.
    • Other songs recall Joy Division and Depeche Mode, as his brittle voice tiptoes to center stage with only a spare backing of guitars and drum loops.
    More example sentences
    • So much so that, in meeting Streep, an edge of brittle insecurity appears faintly visible beneath her ageless face and coolly cordial manner.
    • Hearst's world is populated by nervous, brittle sophisticates who jump joylessly around when the potentate's mistress orders them to Charleston: cats on a very hot tin roof.
    • Poets, popularly, are delicate petals, emotionally brittle and easily roused.

Definition of brittle in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.

There are 2 translations of brittle in Spanish:

brittle2

n

  • tipo de caramelo duro

Definition of brittle in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.