Translation of broadside in Spanish:

broadside

Pronunciation: /ˈbrɔːdsaɪd/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (volley) andanada (feminine) 1.2 (attack) ataque (masculine), invectiva (feminine) to deliver a broadside against sb/sth arremeter contra algn/algo, lanzar* una invectiva contra algn/algo
    More example sentences
    • In an apparent bid to save the crumbling alliance, the two men met yesterday at an undisclosed venue in Cape Town after firing public broadsides at each other for over a week.
    • But Berkovic refused to go without a firing a broadside at O'Neill, claiming the Hoops boss ‘did not even speak’ to the former club record signing.
    • He has blown onto the scene in a torrent of invective, firing broadside after broadside at the crumbling bastions of public morality.
    More example sentences
    • To do this they would have to come up alongside our ships leaving them exposed to a broadside from English cannons on our ships.
    • The Monitor proved impervious to the Virginia's broadsides and captured the imaginations of naval officials and the public.
    • HMS Duke of York fired 80 broadsides; and the Allied ships fired a total of 2,195 shells during the engagement.

adverb/adverbio ( also broadside on)

Definition of broadside in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.