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brute
American English: /brut/
British English: /bruːt/

Translation of brute in Spanish:

noun

[colloquial]
  • 1.1 (person)
    bestia (feminine) or (masculine and feminine)
    bruto, (-ta) (masculine, feminine)
    her son is a big brute of a man
    su hijo es un animal or una or un bestia
    Example sentences
    • Running contrary to the accepted belief that Neanderthals were nothing but savage brutes, the child - either a foetus aged seven months or a child no more than a few weeks old - had been buried in a grave.
    • If the people are not violent brutes then they are passive victims.
    • She was the only young girl in a tavern full of large ugly brutes.
    Example sentences
    • He's a brute, an offense to human decency.
    • Eventually, though, her Catholic aspirations to Protestant gentility and heavy-handed elocution lessons failed to soothe her brute of a husband.
    • The public would view the woman's affair as a sad, desperate attempt to gain some comfort in the hellish life her brute of a husband had imposed on her.
    1.2 (animal)
    Example sentences
    • The landing was home to a pair of scabrous aging brutes, a wolf dog (I suspect) and a forlorn Great Dane.
    • What I remember is that the film starred Will Fyffe, whose big black dog was rather an unreliable brute that was suspected of sheep worrying.
    • Some observers hypothesize that she had been indoctrinated to believe the malicious stereotype of the Ursidae as awkward, clumsy, ill-mannered brutes.
    1.3 (something difficult) See examples: it's a brute to open [colloquial]
    da mucho trabajo abrirlo

adjective

  • (before noun) brute force they used brute force to get him out of the car
    lo sacaron del coche por la fuerza
    Example sentences
    • Tenderness is more of a show of strength than brute force, because it is harder to be compassionate than it is to be mighty.
    • Such relations, contributing to a sense of continuity bridge the gap between the listener and the brute physicality of the musical language.
    • The possession of vast territory, raw physical resources, and brute power guarantees neither prosperity nor peace.

Definition of brute in:

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    Pronunciation: fɔːˈtɪsɪməʊ
    adverb
    (especially as a direction) very loud or loudly
    Cultural fact of the day

    portero

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