There are 4 translations of buck in Spanish:

buck1

Pronunciation: /bʌk/

n

  • 1 (male — of deer) ciervo (m) (macho); (— of rabbit) conejo (m) (macho); (— of hare) liebre (f) macho
    More example sentences
    • Some places base the cost of a deer hunt on the size of a buck's antlers - the bigger the antlers, the more the hunt costs.
    • Herein, we consider two main hypotheses to assess the possible function of the post-copulatory vocalization of fallow bucks.
    • When, freezing and exhausted, he finally felt land beneath his limbs, the buck collapsed.
    More example sentences
    • Marion had never got on with her father, but right now if she saw his face she'd have cheerfully swung the three strong buck rabbits she was carrying into it.
    • During my North Cotswold Mastership, I made Butler, the terrier man, carry a huge white buck ferret on his bicycle, and very useful he proved to be.
    • John, as mentioned at the outset, had two dogs that were almost drowned by a wild buck kangaroo when it took them on in a small reservoir on his family's property.
  • 2 (dandy) [archaic/arcaico] petimetre (masculine) [anticuado/dated]
    More example sentences
    • For many of the young bucks in their scarlet tunics, what starts as a great imperial adventure ends in either a squalid death or captivity.
    • He's both the wise man and the young buck trying to prove himself.
    • That old cliche of a blend of young bucks and seasoned campaigners was there in abundance.
  • 3 (dollar) (especially American English/especialmente inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], dólar (m), verde (m) (Latin America/América Latina) [colloquial/familiar] big bucks un dineral or (in South America also/en América del Sur también) un platal or (in Spain also/en España también) un pastón or (in Mexico also/en México también) un lanón [colloquial/familiar] to make a fast o quick buck hacer* dinero or (in South America also/en América del Sur también) plata fácil they just want to make a fast buck out of the tourists lo único que buscan es hacer dinero or (in South America also/en América del Sur también) plata fácil con los turistas
    More example sentences
    • I know, but it's just five bucks, and at this point I'm almost eager to give it to him.
    • Can you imagine paying 47 bucks to watch skateboarding?
    • It was only about 8 euros, which is about US 10 bucks.
    More example sentences
    • I'd love to subscribe, but it costs nearly a thousand bucks with our meagre currency!
    • This weekend I watched the live lotto draw and wondered what the winner of 10 million bucks would be doing with their cash.
    • I have a cake to make for an 8-year-old's birthday, by order, which will bring in a few bucks on Friday.
    More example sentences
    • Reflecting on the days when he struggled to make a few bucks, Muthukad feels that he has come a long way from the days when he used to set aside money for his return trip soon after reaching the place for his performance.
    • Most of the children earn a few bucks by begging or trash-picking.
    • But today, since the auto driver demanded 35 bucks, I decided to walk.

Definition of buck in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 4 translations of buck in Spanish:

buck2

vi

  • 1.1 [horse/steer] corcovear
    More example sentences
    • The horse was small, but it was sturdy, and it suddenly started bucking and plunging in a manner that would have done a bronco proud.
    • Proper dental care has eliminated dangerous behaviors such as bolting, flipping over backwards, and bucking in a number of my clients' horses.
    • The gelding had almost bucked her off several times, and all we had done was walk and trot.
    1.2 (move jerkily) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [car/deck] dar* sacudidas
    More example sentences
    • I couldn't avoid them all, and the ship bucked and heaved under me as more rocks than I would like to count peppered our outer hull.
    • The boat bucked and spun and entered the rapids.
    • The truck bucked violently as the shock wave slammed against it, and Ian was pelted with small stones and dust, first from behind, then a split second later from the opposite direction.
    1.3 (resist, oppose) (American English/inglés norteamericano) to buck against sth/sb rebelarse contra algo/algn to buck against oat-ing resistirse a + infinitive/infinitivo

vt

  • (especially American English/especialmente inglés norteamericano) [trend] resistirse or oponerse* a to buck the system ir* contra la corriente
    More example sentences
    • European bourses ended the week in the red yesterday, but the Irish market bucked the trend managing to stay ahead throughout the day's trading.
    • The outgoing chief executive still believes you cannot buck the market.
    • But whenever coaches buck conventional wisdom, they face intense scrutiny from reporters and fans.

Phrasal verbs

buck up

[colloquial/familiar]
verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio 1.1 (become cheerful) levantar el ánimo buck up! ¡levanta el ánimo!, ¡arriba ese ánimo! [colloquial/familiar] 1.2 (make effort) (British English/inglés británico) esforzarse* 1.3 (hurry) (British English/inglés británico) moverse* [colloquial/familiar], darse* prisa, apurarse (Latin America/América Latina) 1.1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento levantarle el ánimo a to buck one's ideas up (British English/inglés británico) mejorar el comportamiento, ponerse* a trabajar en serio

Definition of buck in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 4 translations of buck in Spanish:

buck3

adj

  • (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], (before noun/delante del nombre) raso
    More example sentences
    • Like the old buck sergeant he is, Shipley hurried them off to the appropriate ticket agent.
    • In 1954, I became a Ph.D. in mathematics and a buck private in the Army.
    • Pat Reid was buck private to begin with and, even though he was in charge of an important group, he remained a buck private until the day he left Spain.

Definition of buck in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 4 translations of buck in Spanish:

buck4

adv

  • (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar] buck naked en cueros [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of buck in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.