Translation of canned in Spanish:

canned

Pronunciation: /kænd/

adj

  • 1.1 [peaches/meat] enlatado, en or de lata, en conserva
    More example sentences
    • Walk through your local supermarket, and you'll find it in breakfast cereals, canned drinks, processed foods of every sort.
    • The growing use of instant pudding, instant drinks, snack foods, and canned soups reflects growing time constraints.
    • All contributions are gratefully accepted - used clothes, toys, canned food, medical supplies, school equipment.
    1.2 (pre-recorded) [colloquial/familiar] [music] enlatado [familiar/colloquial]; [laughter] grabado 1.3 (drunk) (BrE) [slang/argot], mamado [familiar/colloquial]
    More example sentences
    • Upon her arrival home she was greeted by the sound of canned laughter floating out of the den.
    • To be honest, I preferred the live music, even though it made conversation near-impossible, to the canned music which I found too loud and too intrusive.
    • However, it is important that people should be aware that the proposed bill only applies to live entertainment and not to canned music, which could easily be used more often.
    More example sentences
    • He came out half canned one night and was addressing the ship's company.
    • I got absolutely canned at this bar and ended up spending $600 on two bottles of Don P. Apart from that it was a good time.

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Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.