Translation of carrot in Spanish:

carrot

Pronunciation: /ˈkærət/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 c and u [Botany/Botánica] [Cookery/Cocina] zanahoria (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Besides carrots, other root vegetables include turnips, parsnips, radishes, beets and rutabagas.
    • The accompanying vegetables, peas, carrots and broccoli disappointed a little because they seemed to be overcooked.
    • It came with seasonal vegetables including cauliflower, carrots, new potatoes and sliced courgettes.
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    • Once grown, the plants are difficult to transplant because of their long taproots - parsley is in the carrot family.
    • The hand weeding can be combined with thinning in the case of the vegetables that require it, such as lettuce, carrots and Florence fennel.
    • In addition, biennial weeds such as musk thistle, wild carrot, and burdock should be eliminated before establishing forage.
    1.2 countable/numerable (incentive) incentivo (masculine) a carrot-and-stick policy una política de incentivos y amenazas
    More example sentences
    • We then asked ourselves which approach was actually preferable to persuade them: the carrot or the stick?
    • For juveniles in this category, the Youth Drug Court Program offers both a carrot and a stick.
    • I do support a carrot and a stick approach, in terms of encouraging firstly, more healthy lifestyles and more healthy living.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.