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challenge
American English: /ˈtʃæləndʒ/
British English: /ˈtʃalɪn(d)ʒ/

Translation of challenge in Spanish:

transitive verb

  • 1 1.1 (summon) one knight challenged the other
    un caballero desafió or retó al otro
    he challenged him to a duel
    lo desafió a un duelo
    lo retó a duelo
    to challenge somebody to + infinitive
    desafiar a alguien a que + subjunctive
    I challenge you to prove that!
    ¡lo desafío a que lo demuestre!
    1.2 (offer competition to) See examples: no one can challenge the leaders now
    nadie puede hacer peligrar la posición de los líderes
    they'll be challenged by a coalition at the next election
    en las próximas elecciones se les enfrentará una coalición
    1.3 (question)
    (authority/right/findings)
    (assumption/idea/theory)
    poner en entredicho or en duda or en tela de juicio
    Example sentences
    • He said that either a Newton Hearing, in which the disputed evidence is challenged, or an agreed basis of plea needed to take place before he could proceed with the case.
    • Morrison completes her trilogy by confronting contemporary race and gender representations and challenging declarations of truth and law.
    • By saying she doesn't remember she is tacitly accepting the truth by not challenging it.
  • 2 (stimulate)
    suponer or constituir un reto or un desafío para
    this job will really challenge him
    este trabajo realmente supondrá or constituirá un reto or un desafío para él
    Example sentences
    • The rare breeds hatchery business has challenged them, Drowns says.
    • No strategy he could come up with would challenge him enough to spark interest.
    • During the trading year, random events could spring up to challenge your ability to manage the business through such unforeseen situations.
  • 3 3.1 (stop) (Military)
    darle el alto a
    she was challenged by a store detective
    un guarda de seguridad la abordó
    3.2 (Law)
    (juror)
    Example sentences
    • The parties to any jury trial may inspect a copy of the panel from which the jury in their trial will be chosen, in order to decide whether any should be challenged
    • Defence Counsel may challenge two jury candidates and jurors will be asked if they have any connection with case or defendant.
    • Since one is not allowed to select jurors, but only to challenge (deselect) them, traditional approaches to jury selection have focused on identification and challenge of undesirable jurors
    Example sentences
    • A pioneer in liquid crystal displays, Sharp has seen its once-dominant position challenged by Taiwanese and Korean rivals.
    • Fan is so far the only candidate and no one has yet emerged from the democratic camp to challenge the position she has held for the past seven years.
    • The impressive and young Nurney team have not lost sight of the fact that they are one win away from getting themselves into a promotion challenging position.
    Example sentences
    • The security guard challenged him outside the building and the youngster gave himself up.
    • Harkishin was challenged by security guards when he approached the checkout on Sunday.
    • Sometimes a guard will challenge me and demand to see my pass.

noun

  • 1 countable 1.1 (to duel, race) to issue a challenge to somebody
    desafiar or retar a alguien
    to take up o accept the challenge
    aceptar el reto or desafío
    1.2 (competition) the Democrats are a serious challenge to the government
    los demócratas constituyen un serio rival para el gobierno
    Example sentences
    • Manchester United have won through November in a manner that should presage a championship challenge.
    • They'll come second, but should really be staking a claim for a championship challenge.
    • It was a nice win and one that we needed if we are to mount a challenge for the play-offs.
    1.3 (disputing) See examples: I cannot tolerate this challenge to my authority
    no tolero que se cuestione mi autoridad
    Example sentences
    • Because of this idea of a competitive country, open to the biggest international challenges, I decided to be associated with the creation of A1 Team Portugal.
    • A diversity of masculine subjectivities is mobilized around and through Spike as he comes to terms with challenges to his power.
    • The obsession of kite flying can also be seen in competitive kite challenges.
  • 2 countable or uncountable (stimulation) it isn't going to be easy, but I like a challenge
    no va a ser fácil, pero me gusta todo lo que supone or constituye un reto or un desafío
    Example sentences
    • The novice traveler often must undergo tests or challenges, but the experienced holy person is familiar with the road and the terrain and encounters no such problems.
    • Every day, the dozy dozen face a series of challenges and tasks designed to test the sleep-deprived.
    • It was his brother, Matthew, an architect, who took up the challenge of linking the tiny stone school buildings and turning them into a home.
  • 3 countable 3.1 (by policeman, sentry) 3.2 (to juror)
    Example sentences
    • Most of the hearing time was actually occupied by challenges to the jury, as it were, the panel of military officers that are going to hear the case.
    • The coroner in charge of the inquest is facing a legal challenge to his decision to appoint 12 royal courtiers to the jury
    • In mounting such a challenge, an attorney argues that based on a person's answers to the lawyer's or the judge's questions, that person has proved himself incapable of carrying out his responsibilities as a juror.
    Example sentences
    • Partisan poll workers have been accused of intimidating voters with photographs, heckling, and by challenges to their identity and qualifications.
    • In order to proceed further, you must answer the sentry's challenge by entering the countersign
    • The challenge must be made at a distance sufficient to prevent your being rushed by the person being challenged.

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    Word of the day fortissimo
    Pronunciation: fɔːˈtɪsɪməʊ
    adverb
    (especially as a direction) very loud or loudly
    Cultural fact of the day

    portero

    A portero is a superintendent in an apartment building who looks after it, keeps it clean, delivers mail, and keeps an eye on comings and goings. Porteros often have an apartment in the building as part of their pay. The portero, and particularly the female portera, are part of popular culture. They have a reputation for being inquisitive and fond of gossip.