There are 2 translations of chase in Spanish:

chase1

Pronunciation: /tʃeɪs/

n

  • 1.1 (pursuit) persecución (f) car chase persecución en coche to give chase salir* en persecución de algn/algo, ir* tras algn/algo, darle* caza a algn/algo he ran off and we gave chase se echó a correr y (nosotros) salimos en su persecución or y fuimos tras él or y le dimos caza
    More example sentences
    • Police believe witnesses who saw the car either before the chase, during the pursuit or afterwards could have very important information.
    • A police van called to the house spotted a BMW and the stolen Mercedes heading in the opposite direction but the car got away after a brief chase.
    • From car and snowmobile chases to walking on the ceiling with modified shoes and infiltrating hidden laboratories, Cody has to use all his training to save the world - and maybe get the girl.
    1.2 (hunting) the chase la caza

Definition of chase in:

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Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.

There are 2 translations of chase in Spanish:

chase2

vt

  • 1 (follow, pursue) [thief] perseguir*, darle* caza a; [clients/new business] ir* or andar* a la caza de; [success] perseguir*, ir* en busca de they're both chasing the same woman [colloquial/familiar] ambos andan detrás de la misma mujer
    More example sentences
    • Police arrived and the group fled across fields but were caught when police chased them using a helicopter.
    • I chased after her and caught her left arm with my free hand, forcing her to stop.
    • She chased after her, catching her by the back of her skirt and pulling her to a halt on the second stair.
    More example sentences
    • The composure we saw against Italy at Hampden and against Norway in Oslo had gone, blown away by a visiting team chasing a cause.
    • But that was far from the end of the action, with both teams chasing another goal as though their life depended on it.
    • Performance is the only criterion by which a team chasing greatness can judge itself.
    More example sentences
    • This has helped fuel unsustainable levels of borrowing, which has led to a record £5 billion worth of debt being chased by debt collectors.
    • Parish council chairman Kate Brown said: ‘It is of great concern that you have to keep chasing up answers.’
    • Behind the scenes, however, things could be looking up for Cowling after Councillor John Alderson got onto the district council this week to chase up the matter.
    More example sentences
    • Do you ever have those days where it feels like all you're doing is nagging and chasing people up in order to get them to do the stuff they'd actually promised to do already?
    • But then I feel like I'm chasing people up more and more to be able to do this.
    • I spend a lot of time chasing people for information, and it hurts, I tell you.
  • 2 (drive) echar
    More example sentences
    • The birds were docile on the drive, so the TV people chased them across the road to get some shots of them crossing, being careful to stay out of shot themselves.
    • Every time it ends up being even more of an ordeal than the previous time and I am really sick and tired of them to the point where I just feel like picking up a stick and chasing all of them out of my life.
    • But they were ready to claim as many as 28 to 30 seats based upon a slogan of chasing the government loyalists out of office.
  • 3 (engrave) [metal/silver] cincelar, grabar
    More example sentences
    • The gold foil is chased from the inside with details incised on the exterior.
    • A third of all Roman brooches found in Britain have some applied decoration, and most of the rest have relief decoration that is cast in, chased, punched or engraved.
    • The swirling movement of the dense repoussé and chased decoration and the sinuous spout and handle are in perfect balance.

vi

  • we chased after the thief fuimos or salimos tras el ladrón to chase around after girls ir* or andar* detrás de las chicas we chased all over the place looking for her dimos vueltas por todas partes buscándola

Phrasal verbs

chase up

v + o + adv, v + adv + o
[colloquial/familiar] chase up this order for me, please averíguame qué pasó con este pedido, por favor haven't they paid yet? we must chase them up ¿todavía no han pagado? tenemos que reclamarles el dinero or (AmL tb) tenemos que apurarlos I'll have to chase him up about the report voy a tener que recordarle lo del informe

Definition of chase in:

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Word of the day toque
m
ring …
Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.