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chunky

Pronunciation: /ˈtʃʌŋki/

Translation of chunky in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (-kier, -kiest)

  • 1.1 [person/build] fornido, macizo
    Example sentences
    • The guardsman - a shorter, chunky fellow - rose with ill grace and stumped over to the water pump.
    • She saw a short, chunky girl standing at the edge of Andy's yard.
    • He was a short, square, chunky man, with a round face, not handsome, but compact with energy.
    1.2 [marmalade] con trozos grandes de cáscara
    Example sentences
    • The salsa is different every single time, from scrambled tomato soup to super-spicy chunky tomato marmalade.
    • I love chunky seafood soup, which was also on offer for €5.50, but in the end, I chose Nimmo's warm salad with port dressing for €9.80.
    • The main course has delights such as chicken puttanesca - chicken dices cooked with bacon, olive, tomato, and bell pepper in a chunky tomato sauce, served with steamed rice.
    1.3 [sweater/knitwear] grueso, gordo [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • The bracelet was chunky, a silver concoction of thick ropes linked together.
    • I would like a plain, chunky, black plastic bracelet to wear this autumn.
    • Forget the gold charm bracelet and chunky gold necklaces, big does not have to be brash!

Definition of chunky in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.