Translation of clothe in Spanish:

clothe

Pronunciation: /kləʊð/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 1.1 (provide clothes for) vestir*
    More example sentences
    • In one form or another, corporations of one kind or another feed us, clothe us and provide shelter.
    • Many of them are struggling all on their own, to keep their families together, to house, feed and clothe their children and to provide them with education.
    • In other words, our culture is agrarian at its foundation, farmers provide the raw materials that feed and clothe us all, and our ability to sustain this culture is critical to its survival.
    1.2
    (past tense & past participle/pasado y participio pasado clothed or, clad)
    (dress) [literary/literario] vestir*, ataviar* [literary/literario] the mist clothed the valley in a grey shroud el valle estaba envuelto en un manto gris de bruma [literary/literario] see also clad2
    More example sentences
    • The body was fully clothed in sailing gear and was wearing a life jacket and appears to have been washed up from the Thames Estuary.
    • He was reportedly found fully clothed in a black tuxedo with a white bow tie, lying on his bed.
    • A slim Asian woman stood in the doorway, clothed in a white dress and carrying a laptop.
    More example sentences
    • The new administration clothed itself in garments of morality and quickly initiated a Commission of Inquiry to investigate identified cases of these charges.
    • And they have the audacity to clothe themselves in the language of morality.
    • In the 17th and 18th centuries, Western superiority was clothed in various guises of culture, color, and religion.

Definition of clothe in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.