Translation of coat in Spanish:

coat

Pronunciation: /kəʊt/

noun/nombre

  • 2 (of animals) pelaje (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • For instance, someone who is especially house proud will not want a dog with a long coat which sheds hair all over the furniture.
    • Animals with heavy coats, such as Highland cattle and Galloways, were the most prone to problems, he added.
    • Believe it or not mathematics explains why animals can have coats with spotted bodies and striped tails but not striped bodies with spotted tails.
  • 3 (layer — of paint, varnish) capa (feminine), mano (feminine); (— of dust) capa (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • The env gene codes for a protein on the outer coat of the virus that allows it to recognize and attach to human cells.
    • They code for the coat proteins of the two viruses, which are primary targets for the host immune system.
    • Finally, all the Ames test strains have defective polysaccharide outer coats, to make them more permeable to the test chemicals.
    More example sentences
    • They felt it needed a new coat of paint to freshen it up.
    • Yet another group applied fresh coats of paint on the panels of windows and doors.
    • And how I would love to put a fresh coat of paint on it.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • cubrir* coated with chocolate cubierto de chocolate, bañado en chocolate coat the surface with primer aplique una capa or mano de base a la superficie his tongue was coated tenía la lengua sucia, tenía la lengua cubierta de saburra [technical/técnico]

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.